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MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA - JANUARY 12: Former housing secretary Julian Castro joins Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) during a campaign stop at Fisher Elementary School on January 12, 2020 in Marshalltown, Iowa. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA - JANUARY 12: Former housing secretary Julian Castro joins Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) during a campaign stop at Fisher Elementary School on January 12, 2020 in Marshalltown, Iowa. (Photo by Scott…

Warren acknowledges the struggle of the Latino community and vows to "Restore the Promise of America”

In one of the broader campaign projects of her presidential bid, Senator Elizabeth Warren proposes a "bold structural solution" to the reality that Latinos in…

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Since the beginning of the Democratic primary, the policies proposed by each candidate have been subject to public scrutiny, especially when minorities are involved.

The first candidate to talk about comprehensive immigration reform was former housing secretary Julian Castro, who was building on his experience as a second-generation immigrant in a country that continues to take the Hispanic community for granted.

After retiring from the race, Castro gave his support to Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren in her campaign for "structural change" in the country.

Last Tuesday, Castro shared on social networks what he describes as "Elizabeth's vision for the future of our country," which combines key elements for our community: education, health, and immigration.

In an extensive and detailed document, the Warren campaign explains how the needs of Latinos, although exacerbated in the media struggle during the Trump Administration, are a much deeper issue.

“From Tejano ranchers losing their land in the Southwest to students punished for speaking Spanish in school to toxic dumping in Puerto Rico, the United States has a long-history of government-sanctioned injustices against Latinos,” the campaign says. “Yet, at every turn in our nation’s history, Latinos, Latinas, and Latinx people have been at the forefront of the fight for social, racial and economic justice -- leading with bold, unwavering courage and unshakable hope.”

Warren rescues iconic figures of the community such as Rafael Cordero, Sylvia Rivera, Sylvia Mendez, Dolores Huerta, and Alexandria Villaseñor, and exposes them as symbols of the priorities of Hispanics in the country.

Based on this, the senator proposes:

  • A Pre-K12 Education plan that ensures access to high-quality education regardless of race, color, residence, the language spoken at home, or immigration status.
  • A Comprehensive Debt Relief Plan for Puerto Rico
  • The remodeling of the immigration system that includes a path to citizenship and "fixing the crisis at the border.”
  • Ending the practice of mass incarceration.
  • A comprehensive approach to climate change that ensures "justice for communities of color that have borne the brunt of environmental pollution.”
  • And finally, closing the wage gap between Latinas and everyone else, "because it's time we fully value the work of women of color.”

Similarly, the Warren campaign explains how its overall projects will help close the wage and development gap experienced by Latinos –and communities of color in general– in the United States.

From affordable housing to bankruptcy; from childcare to disability rights, to election reform; from worker empowerment to entrepreneurship, to free education and an end to student debt, to LGBTQ+ rights… Warren seems to show that, in fact, she has a plan for everything.

While candidates like South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg and former Vice President Joe Biden have presented their promises to the Hispanic community –which similarly include immigration reform, health care, housing, and education– the Warren campaign seems to be taking it a step further, putting itself in the shoes of the millions of Latinos who still hope to see themselves not reflected as a demographic, but as part of the country's social fabric.

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