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Selena Gómez and Selena Quintanilla. Source: Getty.
Selena Gómez and Selena Quintanilla. Source: Getty.

From Selena to Selena: Two Latino women proud of their identity

If Selena Quintanilla was alive, would she be anything like Selena Gómez? These revolutionary divas could teach us about being a Latino woman in the U.S and…

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“As a Mexican woman, I feel a responsibility to use my platform to be a voice for people who are too afraid to speak”, wrote in a very sensitive essay published by Times.

Gomez has just produced together with Netflix the documentary series “Undocumented,” about eight families of undocumented people in the U.S.

The young actress, who grew up in a migrant Mexican family, admitted that she is afraid of her country every time she reads the media headlines.

She also asked people to remember that the United States is a country made by migrant people. “How we treat other fellow human beings define who we are,'' she stated. 

Her meaningful speech and her pride in being Latino could inspire young generations to be aware of their political responsibility in a country where more than 31,7 million people are Hispanic, 61% of them under 35.

And there were other women who had traveled that path before Selena. It’s time to honor them, isn’t it? 

Proud of being a Chicana woman

“I didn’t have any opportunity to learn Spanish when I was a child, but It is never too late to approach your roots”, said the singer Selena Quintanilla in an interview made just a year before her death –she was killed by the president of her fan club-.

The Madonna of the Tejano music fought hard to get the acceptance and equality for Latino American women in a genre ruled by “machos” with cowboy hats and riding boats.

Her lyrics sent powerful messages about social justice, the pride of the roots and feminism to her fans: “Ay, ay, ay, how it hurts sexism”, she sang.

Quintanilla, who has her own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, is an idol for artists, feminists and LGTBQ activists whose songs such as ‘I could fall in love’, remind us that a single person may not make a huge difference, but could become a referent for a major change.

Both Selenas are the best example of this.

“I can only wonder how touching you would make me feel since we are separated by a steel border”, I could fall in love.

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