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"Ay mamá", Rigoberta Bandini's hit, became an anthem for feminists
"Ay mamá," Rigoberta Bandini's hit, has become an anthem for feminists. Photo: Getty Images

Feminist slogans in music for International Women's Day

At the beginning of the last century, there were already brave female composers who championed the cause

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With the globalization and momentum of the feminist movement in recent years, many Latin singers and musical bands promoted the defense of women's rights in their songs. But the trend is not recent. At the beginning of the last century, there were already brave female composers who championed the cause. An example is Concha Piquer, who in 1933 sang "if they see two women, it is said that the world is upside down," referring to homosexual love.

"I want to love freely because I was born a woman," she said.

On this International Women's Day of 2022, we highlight several feminist songs in Spanish:

"Ay, Mamá," by Rigoberta Bandini: It was the sensation at the last Benidorm Fest. A tribute to the nature of breasts, and the feminine figure that guarantees the continuity of life.

“I don't know why our boobs are so scary, without them there would be no humanity and no beauty,” sings the chorus that is belted at many parties in Spain.

“Canción sin miedo,” by Vivir Quintana: When the Mexican composer made this song, which became an anthem of the feminist marches in Oaxaca, Yucatán and Veracruz, the singer made it clear: “I say that this song is no longer mine, but of all the partners who are not here and of all of us who are fighting.”

"Ni la hora," by Ana Guerra: The former contestant on Operación Triunfo claimed the right and need to be single if necessary. “Better alone than in bad company,” she sings in her chorus.

“Hello, look how well I am doing alone, nobody controls me. And even if you ask me, I don't even give you the time,” reads the opening lines.

“Teléfono,” by Aitana: It's a vindication against the unnecessary dependence on a toxic partner.

"Close the door, you're going to go out, and although the truth is I never waited for you, I've already been alone and alone I'm fine, I don't need anyone.” 

It's impossible to make it any clearer.

“Hay algo en mi,” by Miriam Rodríguez: “I am a woman, I don't belong to anyone. And I'm still here, ready to get up. I can be whoever wants to imagine me,” sings the artist, icon of Spanish pop-rock. The song is about female empowerment, and soon she will publish her new studio album, La dirección de tu suerte.  

“Gitanas,” by Mala Rodríguez: The legendary Andalusian hip-hop singer also remembers ethnic minorities in the feminist struggle.

"Where are my gypsies, only they know what's going on here," she says.

“Ella,” by Bebe: Included on her album Pafuera Telarañas, which she became popular throughout the world, María Nieves Rebolledo (her original name) produced a powerful feminist hit.

“Today you are going to be the woman you want to be.” she sings in the chorus. An impulse against being intimidated by anything or anyone.

“Emergencia,” by Nathy Peluso: the Argentine singer based in Barcelona also values ​​women resilience and courage.

“I have an angel who takes care of me at dawn. He said don't stop me and that I should be brave. I don't give up for anything," she sings.

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