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Gloria Thomas wears a t-shirt stating "VOTE" while lining up outside in advance of a campaign rally with former President Barack Obama, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, and Senator Bob Casey (D- PA) on September 21, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images.
Gloria Thomas wears a t-shirt stating "VOTE" while lining up outside in advance of a campaign rally with former President Barack Obama, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, and Senator Bob Casey (D- PA) on September 21, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania…

A last-minute guide to registering to vote in Philadelphia before the October 7 deadline

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COMPARTA ESTE CONTENIDO:

While the primary elections in Philadelphia tend to be the more tense and competitive contests because of the city’s deep blue hue, that’s no reason not to participate in Nov. 5’s general election.

However, to do that, you must register on or before this Monday, Oct. 7.

First and foremost, this is a general election. That means you can participate without having declared a party affiliation — a rule that only applies in Pennsylvania for primary elections.

Before starting the process, you have to be:

1. A citizen of the U.S. for at least a month.

2. At least 18 years old.

3. A resident of the city and your election district for at least 30 days before the election.

There are no state congressional races this year, so here is a map of all the City Council districts that will be decided:

To register, you can do it online, through the mail, or in person at certain government agencies. 

NOTE: Because this is the last weekend to register, mail is not recommended. The in-person approach will also only work depending on the hours of operation of the designated government agency.

In Philadelphia, those agencies are:

1. The Philadelphia Voter Registration Office on the fifth floor at 520 N Columbus Blvd., Philadelphia, PA

        HOURS: Monday-Friday, 8:30-5:00pm

        NOTE: This is the only location where Pennsylvania voter IDs can be printed.

2. The Philadelphia County Board of Elections in room 127 at Philadelphia City Hall (1400 JFK Blvd., Philadelphia, PA)

        HOURS: Monday-Friday, 8:30-5:00pm

Voter applications can also be downloaded in 16 different languages here or obtained in person at U.S. post offices, Philadelphia public libraries, state liquor stores or other government offices. They must be returned completed and signed to the above locations on or before Oct. 7.

This year’s Election Day in Philly features both a mayoral and plethora of City Council contests. Most of the district changes of guard were determined in the primary elections, but the at-large, citywide election has the potential to bring some new faces and ideas to City Hall. 

There will also be many state and city-wide judicial appointments and three potential ballot questions. 

One would make Marsy’s Law part of the state constitution, another would borrow $185 million to improve Philly transit, sanitation, economic development and aging municipal buildings and parks, and the last would revise the city charter by amending the procurement process under the Home Rule Charter.

Here is an unofficial list of what to expect.

Over one million people are registered to vote in Philadelphia and more than 8.5 million across PA. Make sure you’re one of them.

When you are, you can check for your polling place here on the big day.

 

 

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