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Photo: Univisión.
Photo: Univisión.

Latinos for Trump, the flip side of the coin

Despite the strong anti-immigrant rhetoric of the White House, 30 percent of Latinos continue to support the Republican Party, with or without Trump.

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In today’s United States, anyone would believe that Latinos are 100% Democratic and opposed to everything that has to do with President Donald Trump.

But this is not entirely true.

Previously we had said how the Latino support to the Republican Party "has changed little" since 2002. After the chaotic policies of the Trump Administration, this panorama still hasn’t changed as expected.

While it is true that the mid-term elections shook the Latino base that remained dormant - that is, non-participatory - data collected by the Associated Press showed that "32 percent of Latinos voted Republican"; this is: 3 in every 10 Latinos voted for the government party, perpetuating a constant that has been in effect for a decade.

According to AP, two specific groups have maintained this trend: evangelicals and veterans.

During the November elections, for example, "Evangelicals comprised about one-quarter of Latino voters, and veterans 13 percent," the media said. "Both groups were about evenly split between the two parties."

Likewise, Trump's "spiritual advisor," Reverend Sam Rodriguez, explained that the radical vote of evangelicals in favor of the president is due to "the Democratic Party’s obsession with abortion."

"It's life and religious liberty and everything else follows," he added.

On the other hand, and since November, a new phenomenon has manifested itself in national politics and seems to set the tone for an important change: a wave of Latino Democratic representatives joined the new majority in the House.

33 of the 44 Latino Democratic candidates won in the elections on November 6, while only 6 of the 15 Republican candidates won a seat.

Even when there is a staunchly Republican Latino corner, the increase in Hispanic participation in elections (120%, according to several polls) demonstrates not only the urgency of a change within the community but also its manifestation when choosing their representatives.

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