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Turing wants to connect Mexican talent with Silicon Valley

In 2021, the company was listed as a unicorn company for its market valuation.

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Turing, a platform that relies on artificial intelligence to remotely connect software developers and engineers anywhere in the world, is turning its gaze towards Latin America, especially Mexico, where the company sees significant potential that should be used more efficiently with its technology.

The global company was founded in 2018 by Jonathan Siddharth, its current CEO, and Vijay Krishnan, its CTO. Currently, the firm is considered a unicorn with a valuation of $1 billion and is one of the favorites of Silicon Valley to hire global talent that can operate remotely.

More than 200 companies, including those backed by Google Ventures, Bloomberg, Andreessen, Founders Fund, and Kleiner, are already using Turing to power their "engineering dream teams." It is backed by big-name investors like former Facebook CTO Adam D'Angelo, executives from Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Twitter, as well as the Founders Fund, "which has investors in Facebook, Tesla, Asana, etc.,” its LinkedIn profile highlights. 

Companies that hire Turing's services seek to shape and energize their engineering teams, while the platform allows engineers to apply from different parts of the world to work with U.S. firms. Turing combines planetary reach and AI to connect business with their ideal remote developers.

Betting on Mexican talent

“In Mexico, more than 130,000 engineers and technicians graduate each year, with significant amounts of talent in Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey, with whom the large American companies, which are part of our client portfolio, are eager to work,” José Luján, leader of the Turing Developers Community in Mexico, told Forbes.

According to Luján, by the first quarter of 2022, they will make Turing's first foray into the Mexican market through digital channels such as Spotify, Twitter and TikTok, seeking to attract the attention of software engineers looking for new full-time professional development opportunities.

About its business model, Luján stated: “Turing works with our engineers to agree on compensation that provides financial stability for them and their families. They receive 100% of that compensation and then we charge US-based companies an additional fee to cover our costs.”

The type of engineer Turing has in mind to connect them with established Silicon Valley firms is the senior-level engineer who is looking for “better financial stability, career growth opportunities, and a more flexible work-life balance than the one he has in the current workplace,” Luján said.

"Our goal is for Mexican engineers to work remotely from their homes, where they have the ability to make positive contributions to the local economy and mentor future generations of technology professionals in the country," concluded the leader of the Developers Community, who hopes that its model and strategy will be positive and attractive to talent in the region.

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