LIVE STREAMING
Mitch McConnell, majority leader in the Republican Senate, speaks with reporters after the party's weekly luncheon on Tuesday at the Capitol. McConnell spoke about a possible vote in the Senate against President Trump's national emergency declaration. EFE/Jim Lo Scalzo
Mitch McConnell, majority leader in the Republican Senate, speaks with reporters after the party's weekly luncheon on Tuesday at the Capitol. McConnell spoke about a possible vote in the Senate against President Trump's national emergency declaration…

Republican Breakdown?

President Trump's decision to declare a National Emergency seems to have been the final blow to his Party’s patience.

MORE IN THIS SECTION

Mexico will rescue miners

August 12th, 2022

Peace dialogues in Colombia

August 12th, 2022

Hugo Velázquez will resign

August 12th, 2022

Latinx vets in PACT

August 12th, 2022

A call for U.S. Cuba Aid

August 11th, 2022

Prosecution vs. Bolsonaro

August 11th, 2022

Cutbacks to the State

August 11th, 2022

Crisis for Pedro Castillo

August 11th, 2022

SHARE THIS CONTENT:

Perhaps it is time to wonder if President Trump has – finally - surpassed the limits of tolerance among Republicans.

After declaring a supposed National Emergency on the border to circumvent Congress and obtain the necessary funds to fulfill a campaign promise, the Democratic-led House of Representatives initiated a procedure to block the measure, with surprising support from the other side of the aisle.

With 245 votes in favor, 13 of them Republicans, Pelosi and her team managed to pass a resolution to suspend the presidential declaration, which now passes to the Senate for debate.

Less than a week later, Republican members have already assured that they will vote against Trump’s National Emergency and in favor of the Democrats’ resolution.

Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.), for example, stated this weekend: "I can’t vote to give the president the power to spend money that hasn’t been appropriated by Congress," The Hill reported. "We may want more money for border security, but Congress didn’t authorize it. If we take away those checks and balances, it’s a dangerous thing.”

According to the Washington Post analysis, Paul's statement "provided what is likely to be the 51st and decisive vote against it," which implies a "combination" of both houses of Congress to overturn a presidential decision.

While it is likely that Trump will resort to a veto to nullify the Congress’ decision - and neither chamber has the two-thirds necessary to annul it - this may prove to be the last straw for GOP patience towards presidential whims.

For months now, the Republican Party has been breaking ranks with the president - between the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan and Syria, Jamal Khashoggi, trade wars, etc.

But this marks, as Aaron Blake explains in his column for the Post, the first time that the Senate, with a Republican majority, has taken concrete measures to stop Trump.

Senator John Kennedy (R-La.), Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), Susan Collins (Maine), Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) and Thom Tillis (N.C.) have joined Senator Paul.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is expected to grant space to vote the blocking resolution before the March 15 recess, which would give a 15-day gap for negotiation.

However, in this scenario, it is likely that the decision will end up in the Supreme Court’s hands to be resolved, while the president loses internal support and pushes the GOP away.

At this point, it seems that most Republicans would prefer to join the Democratic caucus than to give Trump an ounce of power over Congress.

  • LEAVE A COMMENT:

  • Join the discussion! Leave a comment.

  • or
  • REGISTER
  • to comment.
  • LEAVE A COMMENT:

  • Join the discussion! Leave a comment.

  • or
  • REGISTER
  • to comment.
00:00 / 00:00
Ads destiny link