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The President of the United States, Donald J. Trump (L), and Texas Senator Ted Cruz (R) participate in a rally on Monday, October 22, 2018, in Houston, Texas (USA). EFE/Larry W. Smith
The President of the United States, Donald J. Trump (L), and Texas Senator Ted Cruz (R) participate in a rally on Monday, October 22, 2018, in Houston, Texas (USA). EFE/Larry W. Smith

Trump joins the Cruz wagon again, using immigration as a campaign weapon

The president once again put all his efforts into campaigning for one of the few Latino candidates in the Republican caucus for the midterm elections, using…

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In American politics, everything has to do with perspective. But in the Trump era, it seems to have more to do with perennial paradoxes.

After the rise of Beto O'Rourke's campaign in Texas, Ted Cruz's position before the electorate needed an urgent presidential push. That is why Trump decided to go to Houston on Monday to participate in a rally in favor of the re-election of the Republican Latino, assuring that "this will be the election of the caravan, Kavanaugh, law and order, tax cuts and common sense."

According to Politico, the show was again most centered on Trump, more than Cruz's campaign.

"...It was mostly pro-Trump at the Houston rally, as Trump campaign signs far outnumbered Cruz paraphernalia, and as the president walked onstage to take up his favorite talking points,” the media adds.

The president focused on attacking the Democrats and blaming them for the "problem on the border," as well as using the migrant caravan that that is now traversing Mexico towards the U.S. to stoke the vote in favor of Cruz.

"Republicans believe we should protect public benefits for truly needy Americans, not for illegal aliens," the president said. "As we speak, the Democratic Party is openly encouraging millions of illegal aliens to break our laws, violate our borders and overwhelm our nation. The Democrats have launched an assault on the sovereignty of our country."

The presidential verbiage was an unequivocal symptom of the despair before the Blue Wave in the mid-term elections, which is becoming more and more palpable by the day.

On Monday, Trump turned to Twitter to once again threaten Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador with cuts in economic aid if they continue to allow immigrants to travel to the southern border of the United States. It is a move that specialists like Sarah Blodgett Bermeo of Duke University have called a mistake, since "cutting funds for programs that are supposed to fight the drug trade ... doesn’t actually seem like it would be that productive [in terms of stopping illegal migration]," she explained to the Washington Post. “People are going to keep fleeing as long as it’s that bad.”

The recipe remains the same: at the time when the Republican party needs to spur voting, the "nationalist" tittle of Donald Trump remains the strongest engine. That is why campaigns like those of Beto O'Rourke have had to battle from the opposite shore, without money from Political Action Committees, and with boots on the ground to counteract the anti-immigrant machinery of a president who insists on purging his citizenship from everything that looks different to him.

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