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U.S. President Donald Trump holds up a Bible as he stands in front of St. John's Episcopal Church across from the White House after walking there for a photo opportunity during ongoing protests over racial inequality in the wake of the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody, at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 1, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
U.S. President Donald Trump holds up a Bible as he stands in front of St. John's Episcopal Church across from the White House after walking there for a photo opportunity during ongoing protests over racial inequality in the wake of the death of George…

Trump threatens to militarize the country with a bible in hand

The president has once again used authoritarian rhetoric to respond to the discontent of his citizens.

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" When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross," said author James Waterman Wise, who warned of Hitler's rise to power in 1933.

To the alarm of many, that seems to have happened Monday night when President Donald Trump threatened the country with sending the army against protesters demanding justice on the streets for the death of George Floyd.

“I am your president of law and order,” Trump said. “I am mobilizing all available federal resources, civilian and military, to stop the rioting and looting, to end the destruction and arson and to protect the rights of law-abiding Americans, including your second amendment rights.”

Trump then crossed the street to pose for a photo outside St. John's Episcopal Church, holding a Bible, for which law enforcement officers fired tear gas and rubber bullets, chasing away peaceful demonstrators and journalists.

Immediately, social networks were set on fire denouncing that the president was "declaring war" against the American people.

Ron Wyden, a Democratic senator for Oregon, tweeted: “The fascist speech Donald Trump just delivered verged on a declaration of war against American citizens. I fear for our country tonight and will not stop defending America against Trump’s assault.”

Democratic Senator Kamala Harris, told the MSNBC network: “These are not the words of a president. They are the words of a dictator.”

On the other hand, Republicans and conservatives echoed the president's call and took the wink at the Second Amendment as carte blanche from the executive to confront the protesters on their own.

Georgia's 14th District candidate, Marjorie Taylor Greene, shared a video on Twitter with an assault weapon and said the president "declared war" on "anti-fascists" in the country, and she followed suit.

Reporter Josh Albert also shared a video reporting on "two armed white vigilante groups" in Fishtown, Philadelphia, armed and protected by city police.

The increased tension and violence on the streets of the United States now appears to be a product of the divisionism instigated by the White House, which has responded to the weariness and frustration of much of the country with the tribal ignorance of the conservative white voter base.

It is an unrelenting display of leadership that chooses to hide in a bunker and disguise ineptitude with violent demagogy.

“We long ago lost sight of normal, but this was a singularly immoral act,” said Brendan Buck, a longtime former Hill aide who is now a Republican operative, to the Washington Post. “The president used force against American citizens, not to protect property, but to soothe his own insecurities. We will all move on to the next outrage, but this was a true abuse of power and should not be forgotten.”

The Reverend Mariann Edgar Budde, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, said she learned of the president's visit when she saw it on the news.

“I am outraged,” she said, with pauses emphasizing her anger as her voice slightly trembled. “I am the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington and was not given even a courtesy call that they would be clearing with tear gas so they could use one of our churches as a prop, holding a Bible, one that declares that God is love and when everything he has said and done is to inflame violence.”

"And in particular, that of the people of color in our nation, who wonder if anyone ever -- anyone in public power will ever acknowledge their sacred words. And who are rightfully demanding an end to 400 years of systemic racism and white supremacy in our country. And I just want the world to know, that we in the diocese of Washington, following Jesus and his way of love ... we distance ourselves from the incendiary language of this President. We follow someone who lived a life of nonviolence and sacrificial love."

"We align ourselves with those seeking justice for the death of George Floyd and countless others," she continued. "And I just can't believe what my eyes have seen."

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