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Studying programming, big data or artificial intelligence could be an option for Latino students with technological skills from two Washington public schools, according to El Tiempo Latino.
Studying programming, big data or artificial intelligence could be an option for Latino students with technological skills from two Washington public schools, according to El Tiempo Latino.

Verizon supports Latino Student Fund in building careers of the future

Hundreds of students from two schools in Washington D.C. will benefit from the fund donated by the U.S. mobile phone operator.

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Studying programming, big data or artificial intelligence could be an option for Latino students with technological skills from two Washington public schools, according to El Tiempo Latino.

The students will receive training in new technologies thanks to the Verizon-benefited fund that has been awarded to the Latino Student Fund (LSF), a non-profit organization that works to support education within the Latino community.

According to the source, the donation was given to the LSF's board of directors by Verizon's Director of Government and External Relations, Mario Acosta-Vélez, who explained that the goal of this fund is to provide a boost for students with skills and talents in technology careers. For Verizon, it is very important to establish alliances with organizations that support education, so that the doors of the company can be opened and the selected students can be trained at a practical level.

The mobile phone and Internet company gave the organization $100,000 to start working with the 120 students selected in the "Careers of the Future" program.

For her part, the director of LSF, María Fernanda Borja, explained that the $100,000 received will be implemented in their high school programs. "We're going to teach the young people what the careers of the future are, such as mathematics, chemistry, and technological disciplines, to see where they can apply and prepare for their studies now," Borja said.

Each year LSF looks after more than 2,000 children, mostly migrant or Latino migrant children, in Washington, who are being educated in the state's schools and the foundation can help them find better educational opportunities for the future.

The programs run by LSF provide school readiness services, extracurricular activities, tutoring, summer camps, scholarships, and counseling for parents and families. The organization's main goal is to have all Latino students in local schools complete high school.

According to the LSF 90% of the Latino students promoted by its services and workshops, within the Washington area, have completed their training in higher education schools, an encouraging figure when compared to figures from Latino communities in high schools nationwide.

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