LIVE STREAMING
Dr. Ala Stanford comes back to her North Philly clinic after serving as regional director for Region 3 at HHS for a little over a year. Photo credit: Mike D'Onofrio/Axios
Dr. Ala Stanford comes back to her North Philly clinic after serving as regional director for Region 3 at HHS for a little over a year. Photo credit: Mike D'Onofrio/Axios

Dr. Ala Stanford leaves Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to return to her Philadelphia clinic

She served as the regional director of Region 3 for a little over a year.

MORE IN THIS SECTION

50 Years of Community Advoca

November 8th, 2023

Helping Those in Need

September 29th, 2023

Closer to Homeownership

September 28th, 2023

Hispanic Leaders Meeting

September 28th, 2023

L'ATTITUDE is On!

September 27th, 2023

Leading U.S. Economy

September 27th, 2023

Lifting Diverse Businesses

September 26th, 2023

SBA Announcement

September 20th, 2023

SHARE THIS CONTENT:

Dr. Ala Stanford's last day as director of the Department of Health and Human Services’ Region 3, came on May 2. She was originally appointed to the position last April by President Joe Biden. 

After just over a year in the role, she is leaving her position with the federal government to focus on her North Philadelphia clinic, the Dr. Ala Stanford Center for Health Equity. 

Melissa Heard, executive officer for Region 3, will serve as acting director until a new one can be appointed. 

Marvin Figueroa, director of Intergovernmental and External Affairs, HHS said in a statement that, “our whole team has benefited from her knowledge and experience.”

He added, “She has positively impacted and led, important regional priorities and the Biden-Harris administration is grateful for her service. IEA looks forward to all Dr. Stanford will accomplish to elevate the health care needs of historically marginalized communities in Pennsylvania, and beyond.”

While she was at HHS, Stanford shared information through roundtables she led and vaccine fairs. She also did outreach for the national mental health crisis hotline, 988, which was introduced in July 2022. 

Dr. Stanford opened her namesake clinic in late 2021 as a continuation of her work at the Black Doctors COVID-19 Consortium (BDCC). The BDCC was founded by Stanford in 2020 with the goal of providing “COVID-19 testing and healthcare services to underserved communities in Philadelphia during the height of the pandemic.”

The organization rocketed her onto the national stage and earned her many awards, including the PABJ Community Service Award and a CNN Hero Award in 2021. 

She found that many of the people who came to the BDCC for testing and vaccinations did not have access to quality healthcare. The clinic provides several services, including primary care and behavioral health.  

Stanford told The Philadelphia Inquirer that she eventually wants to expand the clinic out of North Philadelphia, but is keeping her focus on the neighborhood first. 

“I need to make sure that the 19132 zip code, where the life expectancy is one of the lowest in the city, has access to preventative care, screening, mental health, gynecology, pharmacy. We do not have enough ambulatory care centers in our zip codes with the lowest life expectancies,” she said. 

  • LEAVE A COMMENT:

  • Join the discussion! Leave a comment.

  • or
  • REGISTER
  • to comment.
  • LEAVE A COMMENT:

  • Join the discussion! Leave a comment.

  • or
  • REGISTER
  • to comment.
00:00 / 00:00
Ads destiny link