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Longoria is a founding member of Time’s Up. Photo by Araya Diaz/Getty Images. 
Eva Longoria is a founding member of Time’s Up. Photo by Araya Diaz/Getty Images.

From desperate housewife to director: Eva Longoria’s plan to end up Trump's “Latinophobia”

The actress, the well-known activist for the Hispanic community’s rights, is the first Latina to direct two major productions and wants to open the doors to…

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“Colourism is in a lot of cultures. You know, this myth that the lighter you are, the better you are,” Eva Longoria says to The Guardian's journalist. 

They are both sitting in the Beverly Hills mansion, which Eva shares with her third husband, the media mogul Jose Bastón, and their son. And she tries to remember how difficult it was to grow up in Texas being the 'darkest' in school. More brown than her three sisters: “I had dark hair, dark skin, and dark eyes. I didn’t look like anybody in my family.”

That’s why she had to overcome many obstacles. "I'm Texicana -she says-. I am more American than Donald Trump" –  whose election in 2016, by the way, cost her a depression.

Now the actress and activist, worried about the current government, will push back and protect the gains after arduous struggles for civil rights: she has found the best way to enhance diversity in Hollywood and put the cameras at the service of social denunciation. She now produces and directs her own productions, something that, on the other hand, allows her to send a more forceful message to society.

“People think I’m an actor-turned-director and producer, but I think I was always a director/producer who happened to fall into acting. I’ve been directing TV for 10 years.” Her work includes episodes of the hit comedies "Jane the Virgin" and "Black-ish", and she has produced two documentaries.

Beyond the stage

“There are so many talented females, but when looking [to fill] positions, studios will give you Tom, Dick, and Harry. You ask: ‘Are there any women?’, and they go: ‘Oh, yeah, we do have some women.’ It’s a second thought. They’re not the first names they serve up.”, stated Longoria, who is one of the founders of Time's Up, the organization born to create a conversation about discrimination and harassment after Harvey Weinstein's scandal. 

Now, when the Mexican American producer and actress is ready to be the director of the biopic “Flamin’ Hot Cheetos”, she is committed to bringing equality and diversity to Hollywood: 

“I always start filling up slots with women and people of color first, then if anything’s left, we will look elsewhere,” she concludes. “So instead of unconsciously ignoring women or people of color, I’m consciously hiring them.”

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