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This Must Be the Place: Latin American Artists in New York, 1965-1975 is a new exhibition just in time for Hispanic Heritage Month. Photo: Leandro Katz
This Must Be the Place: Latin American Artists in New York, 1965-1975 is a new exhibition just in time for Hispanic Heritage Month. Photo: Leandro Katz

'This Must Be the Place,' a showcase of Latino artists in New York City

For Hispanic Heritage Month, an exhibition in the heart of New York City explores the artwork of Latino artists.

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The exhibition This Must Be the Place: Latin American Artists in New York, 1965-1975 is one that presents the generation of artists who actively participated in experimental and political movements while pushing their own language and revolutionizing the art world with works that addressed themes of migration, identity, politics, exile and nostalgia.

Organized by the Americas Society, a group exhibition opened Wednesday, Sept. 22, featuring 41 artists from Latin America and the Caribbean and 11 organizations that laid the groundwork for the artistic New York we know.

The exhibition consists of two parts, both involving the same artists, but showing different works. The first opened on Sept. 22 as part of Hispanic Heritage Month, and will be on display through Dec. 18 of this year. The second will open on Jan. 19, 2022 and run through May 14.

Works by Argentinean Alberto Greco, Cuban Waldo Balart, Uruguayan Luis Camnitzer, Brazilian Antonio Dias, Chilean Juan Downey, Puerto Rican Carlos Irizarry, Paraguayan Laura Marquez or Argentinean Liliana Porter will be on display on the Americas Society.

The exhibition includes installations, photographs, video art, paintings and archival material of the artists. The artists' collective was slow to identify itself as a whole as "Latin American."

"For these artists, 'Latin American' was not a label they necessarily identified with before arriving in New York, but rather a label that became relevant because of shared experiences and a new sense of affinity," said Aimé Iglesias Lukin, director and chief curator of visual arts at the Americas Society.

In addition, solidarity initiatives of groups and collectives that were organized at the time and made efforts to create community and open doors for themselves in the art world are exhibited. The work of organizations such as the CHARAS cultural community center, Taller Boricua, Feria Latinoamericana de Opinión, Concierto Una Velada con Salvador Allende, Brigada Ramona Parra, Contrabienal, Cha/Cha/Cha, Fundación Jóvenes Cineastas, Young Lords and Museo del Barrio will be on display.

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