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The new AL DÍA column brings the best list of Hispanic movies that you should be watching every week.
The new AL DÍA column brings the best list of Hispanic movies that you should be watching every week.

Top 5 Hispanic Films You Should Be Watching

AL DÍA’s weekly selection of Latino movies you won’t find elsewhere.

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El cuento de las comadrejas (Argentina, 2019)

Director Juan José Campanella ("Secret of his eyes") did a remake of the film “Los muchachos de antes no usaban arsénico” (1976) by José Martínez Suárez. It is a beautiful tribute to cinema, with a modern black humor story which is reflexive without becoming pessimistic.

Cinema Novo (Brasil, 2016)

Director Eryk Rocha makes a delicate and deep essay documentary film about the generation of Brazilian directors with which his admired father, Glauber Rocha, stood out as the lead artist of the 50s and 60s movement "Cinema Novo," which made political declarations through art. Now on Mubi.

La noche de los 12 años (Uruguay, 2018)

Álvaro Brechner shows in this Netflix film the story of how the Uruguayan dictatorship of the 70s and 80s kept many Tupamaro leaders in captivity for 12 years, among them José Mujica, now the former president of Uruguay. A silently claustrophobic film

Dios: Una visita incómoda – (Chile, 2019)

This observational documentary by MAFI (Mapa Fílmico de un País) contemplates from a multidimensional vision the visit of Pope Francis to Chile in the times of a crisis in the Catholic Church and a complicated social situation in the country.

Autocannibalism (Venezuela, 2018)

Written and directed by French visual artist Cédric Blaisbois, this short film is a compelling tale of a city without law: Caracas, Venezuela. The presentation is disruptive: vertical format, in a simulation of an Instagram Live, where users witness a kidnapping and express their most primitive desires through comments. Now on Vimeo.

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