LIVE STREAMING
US President Donald Trump is holding a press conference at the White House in Washington, DC on October 13, 2017. US President Donald Trump called on Congress and its international allies to work with him to correct the "serious shortcomings" of the nuclear agreement reached with Iran and five other countries and warned that if it fails to change it, the United States will abandon the pact. EFE / JIM LO SCALZO
US President Donald Trump is holding a press conference at the White House in Washington, DC on October 13, 2017. US President Donald Trump called on Congress and its international allies to work with him to correct the "serious shortcomings" of the…

Trump refuses to approve nuclear deal with Iran

The President has referred the decision to Congress and its allies to "resolve" the way to abandon the pact.

MORE IN THIS SECTION

Biden visits FL

October 5th, 2022

Constitutional Measures

October 5th, 2022

Ads Target DeSantis

October 5th, 2022

New Hispanic poll in PA

October 5th, 2022

Biden’s PR Visit

October 4th, 2022

A Different War on Drugs

October 4th, 2022

SHARE THIS CONTENT:

When it comes to nuclear weapons, nothing is more dangerous than an uncompromising and condemning president.

Donald Trump's verbal and diplomatic retaliation for nations with nuclear arsenals such as North Korea and Iran have heightened tension in what many predict to be the prelude to a third world armed conflict

This time President Trump has condemned Iran and called it a "fanatical regime", refusing to continue certifying an international nuclear agreement.

His decision has been based on accusations against Iran for "sponsoring terrorism" and has said he will deny the regime "a path to a nuclear weapon," the BBC reported.

The international agreement, sponsored by the European Union and other international organizations, was sealed in Vienna in 2015, and limited the Iranian atomic program in exchange for lifting economic sanctions, according to El País.

The agreement marked "a milestone of multilateralism and dialogue" achieved by the Obama administration was an important step in structuring a first understanding between two countries in conflict for more than 40 years and became a model for resolving them.

But not everything was laughter and hugs.

From the outset, Israel - the main protégé of the United States since World War II - opposed the agreement, asserting that Iran's word was not to be trusted and arguing that the agreement" contains an extinction clause that is activated past the decade and that, therefore, does not put an end to the development of nuclear weapons."

According to his economic allies - whom he has defended again as he retired from UNESCO - Trump maintained a strong opposition to the pact since his political campaign, which he described as the "worst pact in the world", and would be fulfilling his word again by breaking it from his seat in the Oval Office.

According to the president, Iran "is not living up to the spirit of the agreement," while "receiving the benefit of sanctions relief regardless”, noting that Tehran has maintained its program of uranium exploitation for technological and research purposes, even if it has suspended its nuclear ballistic program.

Trump's strategy, he said, would resolve the issue, based on the fact that "the United States reserves the right to leave the agreement at any time."

"History has shown us that the more we ignore a threat, the more dangerous it becomes," the president said in regard to his decision.

Only minutes after his speech, European Union foreign affairs chief Federica Mogherini insisted that the agreement was "robust" and that there had been "no violations in any of the commitments." She also said that "no president of the world has the power" to cancel the agreement, which has been established by a resolution of the United Nations Security Council.

European leaders also said that Trump’s decision "will weaken Washington's ability to address dangers from both Tehran and North Korea," the Washington Post reported.

Trump’s gesture has been perceived as a kick to the table of international diplomacy. Norbert Röttgen, chairman of the German parliament’s foreign affairs committee and chief ally of German Chancellor Angela Merkel, confirmed this when he stated that, “keeping faith to an agreement is absolutely fundamental in international diplomacy. And this is exactly what the president is putting into question.” The diplomat foresees the consequences that this could bring for countries like Germany, who have supported the pact since day one.

  • LEAVE A COMMENT:

  • Join the discussion! Leave a comment.

  • or
  • REGISTER
  • to comment.
  • LEAVE A COMMENT:

  • Join the discussion! Leave a comment.

  • or
  • REGISTER
  • to comment.
00:00 / 00:00
Ads destiny link