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On Election Day, Latinx voters, particularly young voters, are making records. Photo: Jon Cherry/Getty Images
On Election Day, Latinx voters, particularly young voters, are making records. Photo: Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Latinx voters have already doubled voter turnout since 2016, Voto Latino reports

In Pennsylvania, the biggest battleground state in the Nation, Latinx early voting is up 840%.

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In the nation’s biggest battleground states, Latinx voters will make all the difference. As the nation beats its own records in previous elections with early voter turnout, Latinx voters have been quietly blowing all other voting demographics out of the water.

It’s been predicted, but without the attention the voting bloc now merits, as Latinx voters have more than doubled voter turnout during the early voting period alone. 

Latinx voters are the second-largest ethnic group eligible to vote today, and with newly-released data by Voto Latino, it’s no doubt Latinos will play a deciding factor, especially in states like Pennsylvania, the largest battleground state in the Nation.

History hinges on winning Florida and Pennsylvania, and young Latinx voters are playing a decisive role in these two “toss-up” states, along with the future of the next four years.

This year has seen unprecedented levels of Latinx outreach, witnessed through millions invested into micro-targeting ads, in-person visits to Latinx communities in highly contested states and districts, and releasing Latinx-specific policies at the last moment. 

After each attempt to appeal to the voting bloc, there remained the same questions: Is this enough? And will Latinx voters — particularly young Latinx voters — respond?

But midway through Nov. 3, there appears to be some clarity.

Voto Latino, co-founded by Eva Longoria Bastón, has registered over 600,000 voters for the 2020 Election Cycle, 73% of which are between the ages of 18 and 39.

 The voter advocacy group recently published the latest statistics for Latinx voters, with particular attention to young Latinx voters, which AL DÍA previously reported, have the potential to make or break the presidential election. 

“We're so proud of the 8.2 million Latinos that already voted, and we're so proud of all of our people that are gonna cast their ballots today! Remember, 3.7 million Latinos turned out in 2016,” wrote Voto Latino on Twitter. 

The organization helped increase the voting potential of young Latinx voters, which today make up the youngest bloc within the Latinx electorate — the only voting group for which this is the case.

“In early voting, Latinx turnout is at its highest level ever, with 6,810,948 votes cast, compared to 3,710,270 cast at this point in 2016. In Pennsylvania, Latinx early voting is up 840% compared to 2016,” reported the org.

For a state that President Trump won by just 44,000 votes, this is big.

This is not to view Latinx voters as a monolith, but by and large, Latinx voters vote Democratic. There are exceptions, of course, but the majority of the voting bloc, especially when it comes to young Latinx voters, goes blue. 

According to the NALEO Educational Fund, 1.7 million young Latinx voters have voted early nationwide, up 313% from 2016.
 

That’s millions of new voters, when Trump won by thousands, who will make the definitive outcome this week. 

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