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Trump’s impeachment was historic, but it was also a time when BIPOC representatives and city reps used their platforms to collectively denounce white supremacy. Photo: AL DÍA File/Malcolm Kenyatta
Trump’s impeachment was historic, but it was also a time when BIPOC representatives and city reps used their platforms to collectively denounce white supremacy. Photo: AL DÍA File/Malcolm Kenyatta

This is what Philadelphia’s Black and Latinx leaders had to say on Trump’s second impeachment

Local leaders weigh-in on impeachment, white supremacy, and what needs to happen next.

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The public called for accountability after a white supremacist mob attacked the U.S. Capitol last week. It was at the cost of five dead, and a government at the brink of lost democracy. 

Supporters who took part in the attack, including current police officers have been arrested across the nation, and the FBI is on a manhunt for those involved in the violence. 

On Jan. 13, history was made again after lame-duck president Trump was impeached for a second time by the House of Representatives, and the Senate is set to decide his fate when they resume session after President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration. 

The Senate vote is what will decide whether Trump will be able to run for office again. 

It was House representatives who drove the impeachment proceedings to come to fruition, and the advocacy from progressive members of Congress who drafted bills garnered signatures, and more in time to impeach exactly a week after the insurrection. 

Reps like Cori Bush, who, when she presented her impeachment argument on the House floor was booed by House Republicans for daring to speak out against white supremacy.

Bush has said her first resolution in Congress will be to “call for the expulsion of the Republican members of Congress who incited this domestic terror attack on the Capitol.”

A Philadelphia state representative who says he has experience being booed himself is Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta (PA-181).

He responded to Rep. Bush’s tweet where she asked, “What does it mean when they boo the Black congresswoman denouncing white supremacy?”

Rep. Kenyatta replied, “I think that just means you’re doing your job.”

He also voiced his criticism of Pennsylvania House Republicans. 

He called Jan. 13 a “sad day” for the state after all of its GOP reps voted against impeachment.

Philadelphia Councilmember Maria Quiñonez Sánchez told AL DÍA that the impeachment was a long time coming, but the riot on Jan. 6, surely intensified the situation. 

"Donald Trump has been a fraud for a long time, but the riot at the Capitol took things to a whole new level. I totally support impeachment. I was proud to see that our local members of Congress stood up for democracy by voting for the resolution," she wrote in an email. 

One of the said local leaders in Congress was Rep. Dwight Evans (PA-03), who co-sponsored the articles of impeachment against Trump and voted to remove him on the 13th. 

Evans was also one of just 58 House members who voted for impeachment in 2018.

“Today I voted to impeach President Trump in connection with Trump’s incitement of a violent attack on our nation that led to the deaths of six people, including two Capitol police officers,” Rep. Evans wrote.

Evans has since released a statement on McConnell’s decision to delay the Senate impeachment trial until after his departure from office, emphasizing that whatever he is able to get away within this week will be McConnell’s responsibility.

Many have compared this delay to the expedited speed at which the Trump administration was able to confirm Justice Amy Coney Barrett, just days before the Presidential election. 

“President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris will be sworn in January 20, but a lot can happen in seven days. The Senate should act now,” Evans wrote.

Trump’s impeachment was historic, but it was also a time when BIPOC representatives and city reps used their platforms to collectively denounce white supremacy, which, once Trump is no longer president in a week, will continue to endure within the highest levels of office. 

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