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Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is sworn in for his confirmation hearings, Sept. 4, 2018, Washington, D.C. Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images
Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh before his confirmation hearings, Sept. 4, 2018, Washington, D.C. Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images

Most Latinos believe that Brett Kavanaugh should withdraw

The National Association of Latino Elected Officials has released survey figures on the opinion of Latino voters regarding the nomination of Judge Brett…

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The entire country has witnessed, directly or indirectly, the testimony of Christine Blasey Ford before the Senate Committee that will determine the vote on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court of Justice.

After the nomination of the judge by President Trump in July, it seemed Kavanaugh would be uninterrupted on his way to becoming the next Supreme Court justice, replacing Justice Anthony Kennedy after his retirement.

However, three women have come to the public eye with accusations against the nominee for inappropriate sexual behavior, something that has been considered by the president and the Republican Party as a ploy by the Democrats to prevent another conservative from being part of the highest judicial organ in the country.

The accusations have turned into a partisan confrontation behind closed doors and a moral scandal in the streets of the country.

Data published by the Washington Post have shown that both parties are divided radically regarding whom to believe, Republicans favoring Kavanaugh and Democrats the opposite.

But what does the country think?

Surveys published by the Huffington Post, The Economist and Politico show that only 34 percent of respondents believe that Kavanaugh should be confirmed, while 37 percent believe that he shouldn’t.

In the same way, male voters are more inclined toward confirmation (42 percent versus 37 percent). Female voters, on the other hand, are opposed, 39 percent versus 27 percent.

However, the Latino community in the country has a stronger opinion.

After four weeks of follow-up and surveys, the National Association of Latino Elected Officials (NALEO) has released figures demonstrating the growing opposition of Latino voters to the nomination of Kavanaugh.

According to NALEO executive director Arturo Vargas, "as the (confirmation) process has continued, an overwhelming majority of the Latino electorate wants (Kavanaugh) to withdraw from the nomination process and believes that a new nominee should not be selected until after the (mid-term) elections.”

The association surveyed 250 registered Latino voters each week for a month, of which almost 75 percent believe that Brett Kavanaugh should retire from the nomination.

The funny thing is that the voters don’t believe that he shouldn’t have been nominated, but that the judge himself must withdraw voluntarily.

NALEO adds that the respondents also said they keep perceiving a distance between elected officials and the community - including Democrats, who are in the final stretch to obtain all the necessary support and retake the majority in Congress.

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