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Sylvia Garcia (L), and Verónica Escobar are the two Latina women who with 60% of the votes have become the next candidates for the Texas Congress.
Sylvia Garcia (L), and Verónica Escobar are the two Latina women who with 60% of the votes have become the next candidates for the Texas Congress.

Latinos and women are the true winners in Texas primaries

At a critical moment for the political landscape in the country, and in a fervently conservative state like Texas, the primaries have resulted in a large…

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The race for a political reorganization in the United States begins and the epicenter is the conservative state of Texas.

Yesterday, thousands of citizens went to the polls to elect their possible candidates for the mid-term elections this November in the Republican heart of the United States.

After Donald Trump won the presidential elections in the state of the lonely star with 52.2% of the vote against Hillary Clinton, a year of political disasters has given the Democratic Party the opportunity to overcome the polls and assume the great challenge to turn Texas into a more liberal state.

As reported by the Los Angeles Times, the Democratic turnout in last Wednesday's elections "was the highest in 16 years", boosting female candidates in a race often dominated by the typical symbol of the Republican white man, in a gesture of open discontent with the current president and his policies.

"The Republicans kept their edge in the total number of votes cast, but the Democrats made significant inroads in what has been Republican dominance for decades," the newspaper said.

This "inflated" Democratic participation was reflected in almost 1 million votes (twice the number registered in 2014), a number that had not been seen since the post-9/11 elections, according to Vox.

The campaigns were radically opposed, with the Republicans being the most aggressive against their opponents, who on the contrary opted to win the confidence of even those iron-clad conservatives who don’t want to see their state in the hands of liberals.

For Gina Ortiz-Jones, Democratic candidate for a border district with Mexico (District 23), "a Congress that is only 20% female is not where we should be," he confessed. "This is not a spectator sport. We have to participate, everyone, and that's the important thing. "

Ortiz-Jones is part of an important wave of candidates who have set a goal to change the direction of the country and represent a population with new perspectives for the nation.

But an important group of Latinos has risen in the lists.

Rey Gonzalez (R-D34), Sylvia Garcia (D-D29), Carmen Montiel (R-D29), Roy Barrera (D-D27), Joaquin Castro (D-D20), Veronica Escobar (D-D16), Vicente Gonzalez (D-D15) and Jana Lynne Sanchez (D-D6) are the new Hispanic names in the Texas race, with a pre-eminent female presence in both parties.

In particular, Veronica Escobar and Sylvia Garcia will compete to become the first Latino congresswoman "in a state where a population boom has been driven by Latino growth," the Times continues, having both won the primaries with 60% of the votes.

Of the nearly 50 women who competed for the primary in the Texas Congress, more than half won or went through to runoffs, as Vox explains, opening the possibility that two Latina women could reach the office for the first time.

Sylvia Garcia dedicated her victory to Latinos who, "for too long have sat on the political sidelines while the president sits in the White House blaming all of our problems on immigrants," the Houston Chronicle reported.

While the results have been very optimistic for the Democratic bench, its candidates will have to face strong, traditional, and Republican figures such as Governor Greg Abbott, who will have to confront either the Latina sheriff Lupe Valdez (first in her position as Latina and homosexual) or the conservative Andrew White, having both passed to a second round in May.

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