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A man in a bank in Brownsville, Texas, a part of the South Texas area now in the sights of the Trump administration. Some people in the area have their US citizenship challenged. Getty Images
A man in a bank in Brownsville, Texas, a part of the South Texas area now in the sights of the Trump administration. Some people in the area have their US citizenship challenged. Getty Images

It's getting harder to be Hispanic in the Trump Era

A study carried out by the Pew Research Center determined that the stability of Hispanics under President Donald Trump has gone downhill.

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It’s not collective hysteria or exaggeration. When we report the growing threat that the Hispanic community feels due to the measures of the Donald Trump government, we are not speaking from the comfort of our seats.

A new study by the Pew Research Center has shown that almost half of Hispanics in the United States "feel that the situation has worsened for people of their ethnicity during the last year," the Washington Post reported.

47% of respondents said they feel that the circumstances for Latinos have deteriorated in the country, only 3 points below the worst figure recorded in history that coincided with the Great Recession.

Also, and as the study continues, "more say they have serious concerns about their place in American society right now (49%) than in 2017 (41%). And the majority (55%) say they are worried that a family member, a friend or themselves may be deported."

Many have attributed this feeling to the Trump Administration's measures, among which 67% said that "government policies have been harmful to Hispanics,” a considerable increase in the 10 percent rate during the Barack Obama administration or 41 percent during the George W. Bush government.

We have insisted that the Hispanic community in the United States cannot be evaluated in a homogeneous way - the PRS defines it as "not monolithic" - and their attitudes and responses usually vary by many factors. For example, only 23% of Latinos identify as Republican or "inclined towards", of which six out of ten approve of President Trump's work, compared to 8 percent of Latino Democrats who say similarly.

However, considerable percentages (27 and 57 percent) of both populations agree that the situation has only worsened for their community.

Correspondingly, the legal status of respondents varies widely: 49 percent are foreigners and their concerns are higher. Among them, 57 percent have "serious concerns about their place in the United States" and 66 percent deeply fear deportations.

In general, 54 percent of the total considers that the situation has gone from bad to worse, and close to four out of ten respondents have claimed to have experienced some type of "offensive incident" during the last year because of their ethnicity.

The good news is that, among all respondents, six out of ten registered voters (59 percent) say they "are more enthusiastic when it comes to voting in these midterm elections than in the last congressional elections."

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