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The lack of Latino representation in the film and television industry starts a conversation about how the industry mirrors or misrepresents reality. PHOTOGRAPHY: El Herraldo​​​​​​​
The lack of Latino representation in the film and television industry starts a conversation about how the industry mirrors or misrepresents reality. Photo: El Heraldo

Joaquin Castro criticizes the Golden Globes for its lack of Latino representation at latest ceremony

The lack of racial diversity at the latest Golden Globe ceremony is back in the news after Joaquin Castro brought it up.

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There were three Latino representatives nominated at Sunday's 78th Golden Globes ceremony.

American-Argentine-British actress Anya Taylor-Joy, who won her first Golden Globe for "Best Actress in a Miniseries or Television Movie" for her starring role as chess prodigy Beth Harmon in Gambito de dama.

Puerto Rican-born actor and playwright Lin-Manuel Miranda, nominated for "Best Actor in a Motion Picture Musical or Comedy" for his portrayal of Alexander Hamilton in the film version of his hit Broadway musical Hamilton.

And finally, the film La Llorona, a horror film by Guatemalan director Jayro Bustamante, which was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film.

Texas Rep. Joaquin Castro called attention to the lack of representation of Latino artists, screenwriters, directors, and productions, opening the way for a debate on social media.

The lack of  Latino representation in the film and television industry opens up a conversation about how the industry mirrors or diverges from reality.

According to 2019 data from the U.S. Census Bureau, people of Hispanic or Latino origin represent 18.5% of the country's total population, while in the industry Latinos represent 4% of directors and 3% of producers working on top-grossing films.

The discussion about the representation and inclusion of non-white communities in the film industry has been ongoing for the past several years.

The problem is addressed in an industry where it is easy to find Black, Latino, or ethnic minority characters represented under negative stereotypes that are reproduced in the collective imaginations, but are not equally recognized when these communities build their own narratives.

A little over a month ago, the Sundance Film Festival included The Latinx House project as a way to guarantee diversity and representation in its 2021 edition, an example that could be followed by other spaces in the film industry.

During the ceremony itself, presenters Tina Fey and Amy Poehler called attention to the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) itself, the entity in charge of administering the awards, for not having any Black members within the association.

"This is something we probably should have said before, everyone is understandably upset with the HFPA and their choices. Look, a lot of flashy garbage was nominated... But several Black actors and Black-led projects were passed over," Poehler said.

Fey added: "Look, we all know awards shows are stupid. The point is, even with stupid things, inclusivity is important, and there are no Black members of the Hollywood Foreign Press. I realize, HFPA, that maybe you didn't get the memo, because your workplace is the back booth of a French McDonald's, but you need to change that."

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