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The House is expected to vote on impeachment on Wednesday, Jan. 13. Photo: Erin Scott/Reuters

A second impeachment begins and what it means for 2024

One of the many new articles of impeachment being leveled against President Donald Trump may never allow him to hold public office again.

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As the aftershock of last week’s Capitol riots sets in, momentum is increasing in the House to remove President Donald Trump from office, either through the 25th Amendment or through a second impeachment. 

House speaker Nancy Pelosi said for the first time on Sunday, Jan. 10, that the House will move to impeach Trump if Vice President Mike Pence does not remove him. 

Pelosi said that the House will attempt to pass a unanimous resolution calling for Pence and Trump’s cabinet to invoke the 25th Amendment and remove Trump from office. 

Given the likely Republican resistance, the resolution will probably not pass. In that case, the measure will be brought to the floor for a full vote on Tuesday.

“In protecting our Constitution and our Democracy, we will act with urgency, because this President represents an imminent threat to both. As the days go by, the horror of the ongoing assault on our democracy perpetrated by this President is intensified and so is the need for immediate action,” Pelosi wrote in a letter to Democratic colleagues.

House Democrats plan to introduce at least one article of impeachment against President Trump  for “incitement of insurrection.” The article will be introduced by Reps. Jamie Raskin, Ted Lieu, and David Cicilline, along with more than 200 Democratic co-sponsors. 

The measure states that Trump has “demonstrated that he will remain a threat to national security, democracy and the Constitution if allowed to remain in office, and has acted in a manner grossly incompatible with self-governance and the rule of law.” 

Rep. Ilhan Omar also has two articles of impeachment prepared, related to Wednesday’s attack as well as the call Trump made to Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, in which the president requested an overturn of Biden’s victory in the state. 

In an opinion piece for the New York Times, Rep. David Cicilline explained in great detail why lawmakers are calling for Trump’s removal. 

“There can be no healing of the divisions in our country without justice for the man most responsible for this horrific insurrection. The President must be held accountable. That can happen only by impeaching him for a second time and convicting him in the Senate. A conviction that would allow Congress to prohibit him from ever serving in federal office again,” he wrote. 

In an interview on CBS’ 60 Minutes Jan. 10, Pelosi said she liked the idea of invoking the 25th Amendment “because it gets rid of him,” but also added that, “one of the motivations people have for advocating for impeachment” is to prevent Trump from holding office again. 

As of 11 a.m. on Jan. 11, a single impeachment article was introduced to the House, pointing to Trump’s repeated false claims that the election was fraudulent, his speech to the crowd of rioters on Jan. 6, and his call to the Georgia Republican Secretary of State. 

“In all this, President Trump gravely endangered the security of the United States and its institutions of Government,” the resolution reads. “He threatened the integrity of the democratic system, interfered with the peaceful transition of power, and imperiled a coequal branch of Government. He thereby betrayed his trust as President, to the manifest injury of the people of the United States.” 

The resolution also cited the Constitution’s 14th Amendment, stating that it “prohibits any person who has ‘engaged in insurrection or rebellion against’ the United States” from holding office. 

Cicilline said it best on Twitter, “If you can’t be trusted with a Twitter account, you shouldn’t be trusted with nuclear codes. #Impeach.” 

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