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U.S. President Donald J. Trump (R) Announces Federal Appeals Court Judge Brett Kavanaugh (L) as his candidate to replace Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., on July 9, 2018. EFE/EPA/MICHAEL REYNOLDS.
U.S. President Donald J. Trump (R) Announces Federal Appeals Court Judge Brett Kavanaugh (L) as his candidate to replace Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., on July 9, 2018. EFE/EPA/MICHAEL…

Five things we learned from the Kavanaugh disaster

After the preliminary vote on Friday, there was little doubt that the presidential nominee for the Supreme Court, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, would be confirmed…

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These last weeks have been a whirlwind for the entire country, following a pattern that has marked the Trump Administration since the day of its inauguration.

For a nation strongly divided between Republican tribalism and Democratic stagnation, the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court of Justice of the United States has been the hardest blow.

However, the chaos of recent months around the presidential nominee has made clear several key issues.

Presidential whims have a new range of scope

Since President Trump announced Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court last July, many have wondered what the nominee could possibly have that other candidates do not. As the confirmation hearings developed, Kavanaugh was drawn as a “tailor-made” possible justice for the administration, thanks especially to his conservative radicalism. Kavanaugh has a strong record of rulings against environmental regulations, gun control, and abortion, and he participated in the investigation against President Bill Clinton — all of which represent fundamental ground battles for the president, who will now have a strong ally in the Supreme Court.

The path of misogyny leads directly to high positions

While accusations of sexual harassment against Kavanaugh reached the public in the last moments of his nomination process, in any democracy such as the one the United States insists on promoting those accusations would be reason enough to launch a formal investigation and suspend the nomination of an official, especially when postulating to the Supreme Court for a job for life.

But in the Trump era, the voice of a woman like Dr. Christine Blasey Ford is dismissed immediately, especially in the eyes the Republican party. The descriptive testimony of Ford and claims from two other women were useless because, in a country whose president has been recognized for his misogyny, sexism gives extra points and padding to one's resumé.

A "barometer" nomination

The battle in which the Kavanaugh nomination was transformed proved not only the "old fox" cunning of the GOP but also the inexperience and naivete of the Democratic Party. The partisanship has lengthened the aisle in a country waiting for a mid-term election that could save the game. It’s as if the Democrats have placed in the hands of the voters the solution to a chaos of which they have been a passive coauthor.

The ace up Trump’s sleeve

The president's nightmare is called Robert Mueller and it has manifested itself in the form of an investigation into alleged obstruction of justice, collusion with foreign agents, and fraud. But the arrival of Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court will give the president the possibility of shielding himself from possible impeachment. According to The New Yorker, Kavanaugh wrote in a 2009 article in the Minnesota Law Review that "Congress should consider exempting sitting Presidents from criminal indictment, because such cases were distracting and 'inevitably politicized'; at the same time, he wrote, ‘If the president does something dastardly, the impeachment process is available.’ Trump, anyway, seems satisfied.”

The demoralization of a country does not guarantee the votes

Activist groups like the Women's March and Democratic representatives nationwide have called on citizens not to be discouraged by Kavanaugh's confirmation; "resist and vote" has been their slogan. But historically, citizens who lose faith in the legal system and in political parties often stay at home on Election Day. What could really guarantee the so-called "Blue Wave" in November is the summation of everything the Trump Administration has done so far and the scope of grassroots campaigns within the less traditional wing of the Democratic Party.

One way or another, Kavanaugh is the latest - and most bitter – presidential victory.

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