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En 2019, 19,8 millones de hispanos que vivían en Estados Unidos habían nacido en otro país; esto es el 33 % de toda la población latina. Foto: PEW Research Center
In 2019, 19.8 million Hispanics living in the United States were born in another country; this is 33% of the entire Latino population. Photo: Pew Research Center

Latinos say there are better opportunities in the U.S. than in their home countries, research shows

PEW Research Center research analyzes how migrants perceive their situation in the country. 

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A Pew Research Center analysis found that 83% of Latino immigrants surveyed say there are better life opportunities in the United States and 76% say there are better conditions for raising their children in this country. 
 
"Undocumented immigrants say that life in the U.S. is better," said Mark Lopez of the Pew Hispanic Center. 
 
The institution surveyed 3,375 adult Latinos nationwide in March 2021 and found, in addition to the data pointed out, that 69% of migrants perceive that medical care is more affordable in the United States, and 56% consider that the treatment given to the poor in this country is better than that provided in their nations of origin. 
"Hispanics have these positive views of the United States whether they were born in Puerto Rico, in some other country, or in one of the 50 states and the District of Columbia," the report said. 
 
However, the opinions received in the survey are not entirely positive. When it comes to how immigrants are treated in the country, only 34% of respondents believe that treatment is better in the U.S. than in their home countries. 
 
"Among U.S.-born Latinos, three in ten second-generation Latinos — children of U.S.-born immigrants or Puerto Rico-born parents — say immigrants are treated better in Puerto Rico or in their parents' country of birth. By comparison, 16% of third-generation or older Latinos say the same," the institute said in its research. 
 
In addition, 84% of Latinos born in Puerto Rico or other countries indicated to Pew that they would immigrate back to the United States and only 7% indicated that, given the opportunity, they would immigrate to another country.
 
"The arrival of millions of immigrants from Latin America over the past half-century, and continuing immigration from Puerto Rico, continue to shape the demographics of the U.S. Hispanic population," the Pew Center said. 
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