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Photograph of the actress performing in the play "Casi Dahiana", in Montevideo. EFE/Matias Fabricio/Teatro Solís
Photograph of the actress performing in the play "Casi Dahiana," in Montevideo. Photo: EFE/Matias Fabricio/Teatro Solís.

Female voices take the stage in Uruguayan theatrical series

Lost verses and silent voices of women "forgotten" on stage as the protagonists of a theatrical cycle via streaming from Uruguay.

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Since 2017, "Ellas en la Delmira" at Teatro Solís of Montevideo has been promoting to highlight plays created or directed by women and bring them to the Uruguayan billboard. The 2021 proposal had to be adapted to the virtual format by COVID-19 to present the four selected plays at the Delmira Agustini Hall of the Solís: De apellido Amor, Casi Dahiana, Cuca and Era como que bailaba, to theaters in other locations in Uruguay. All the plays participating in 'Ellas en la Delmira' have women as protagonists. 

Actress and playwright Leonor Chavarría, creator of the monologue Casi Dahiana tells EFE that participating in this cycle is both "a source of pride" and "a great challenge" because it implies having a platform of visibility that artists find difficult to achieve.

"I started writing a text that had to do with this fear of being in the middle, of being mediocre, of not being able to reach what one desires and not feeling complete," she points out about the character in her play, a rural woman who dreams of leaving the village to become an actress.

Olegaria Machado Amor is another of the "forgotten" voices participating in the cycle. A 19th century poet, she stars in the play "De apellido Amor." Its director, Susana Souto, states that this woman was a great artist but ended up in silence. Souto, relates that this deep silence in which she ended up shrouded is what is most striking when investigating her life. "We know that she wrote many poems but only two have survived to our days. Her birth certificate was never found. There are a number of mysteries that we try to bring to a history with part fiction and part of the little we know about that reality," says the director.

About the virtual format, Souto says it is "a mystery." 

Both directors say that it will be their first time doing something that "is neither cinema nor theater," and emphasizes the work and modifications that have had to be made to the plays in this format.

The actress also highlighted the importance that, by whatever means, theater continues to be made, despite the virtual reality.

"It seems to me that it is a place of great privilege that we have today, with the addition of this complex situation of the country, of the world, that there is no theater; there are no voices to tell or sing anything," she emphasized.

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