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WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 11: Photographers make images of Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg as he testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee at the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

From the Cambridge Analytica scandal to the shooting in New Zealand, social networks are at the center of the debate. Maybe it's time to take a look at the human behind the technology.

[OP-ED]: Does ‘executive function’ play a role in how likely police officers are to use deadly force?

 07/13/2017 - 11:13
Study of the Philadelphia police was unique because of its access to such a deep trove of information on officers, as most departments do not make such data available. File

The concept of “executive function” was popularized by social science research showing that young children who can control their impulses, pay attention, remember details, manage their time and plan are more likely to be successful in school.

Demonstrators gather at Texas Capitol to protest law prohibiting "sanctuary cities" in the state.

 05/30/2017 - 02:56
Demonstrators gather at Texas' Capitol, to protest a recently-passed law prohibiting "sanctuary cities" in the state, in Austin, United States, May 29, 2017. EFE/Alex Segura

About 1,000 demonstrators arrived from Washington, New York, Los Angeles, Arizona, North Carolina, New Mexico, Maryland and Virginia and protested with other Texas organizations to express their disagreement with SB4, which allows local authorities to question the immigration status of people who, for example, are detained or arrested for a traffic violation.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

[OP-ED]: Is your phone eavesdropping on your conversation about cannibalism? Mine may have.

 03/08/2017 - 18:41

Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

If you were to read biology professor Bill Schutt’s new book “Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,” you’d have lots to talk about at the dinner table.

There are, for instance, sections on how cannibalism is portrayed in popular culture, news stories and historical texts. Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda