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Photo via sportsthenandnow.

The ALLIANCE: Los Angeles is a five-year commitment to create social impact for Black communities in the city. 

"Era como volver a 1960", cuentan testigos de la marcha supremacista en EEUU

 08/14/2017 - 05:06
People place flowers at the corner of Fourth and East Water Street in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, 13 August 2017. A woman killed when a car slammed into counter-protesters at that intersection following the cancelation of a planned white supremacist march in that city was identified on 13 August 2017 by authorities as 32-year-old Heather Heyer. EPA/TASOS KATOPODIS

Una de las víctimas ha sido identificada como Heather Heyer, activista anti-racista,  de 32 años.  En un intento por frenar la lluvia de críticas contra Donald Trump por su ambigua respuesta al ataque sucedido en Charlottesville el pasado sábado, la Casa Blanca emitió un comunicado 36 horas después en el que condemnaba a los "supremacistas blancos" por incitar a la violencia. 

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

Heather Heyer, Charlottesville Victim, Identified as Anti-Racism Demonstrator

 08/14/2017 - 04:50
People place flowers at the corner of Fourth and East Water Street in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, 13 August 2017. A woman killed when a car slammed into counter-protesters at that intersection following the cancelation of a planned white supremacist march in that city was identified on 13 August 2017 by authorities as 32-year-old Heather Heyer. EPA/TASOS KATOPODIS

Trying to stop the fallout over President Trump’s ambiguous response to this weekend's incident in Charlottesville, Va., the White House condemned “white supremacists” for inciting violence in a statement, issued 36 hours after the protests began.

Plain Text Author: 
Andrea Rodés/ EFE

[OP-ED]: The importance of minority teachers in our schools

 04/27/2017 - 14:30
According to a new statistical analysis by the U.S. Department of Education, even though minority teachers remain underrepresented, both the number and proportion of minority teachers in elementary and high schools grew by 104 percent between 1987-88 and 2011-12, compared with 38 percent growth in the number of white teachers.

Black teachers make a difference.

I know because I attended a prestigious college-preparatory public high school in the heart of Chicago where approximately half of the teachers were black. They included my AP Biology teacher and AP English teacher, several of my art teachers, one of my history teachers, a chemistry teacher -- and probably many more I’m forgetting in the haze of the past quarter-century.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda