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Gay businesswomen Michele Nobre (l.) and Stephanye dos Santos (r.) get married on Nov. 24, 2018, instead of waiting longer as they had planned, out of fear of a reduction of LGBT rights in Brazil following the inauguration of President-elect Jair Bolsonaro. EFE-EPA/Sebastiao Moreira
EFE

Many fear an escalation of violence as well as legal concerns after controversial comments made by the president-elect. 

Rock and Roll and Resistance: A Conversation with Alejandro Escovedo

 08/11/2017 - 12:25
Alejandro Escovedo for Burn Something Beautiful by Nancy Rankin Escovedo 

Mexican-American musician and activist Alejandro Escovedo elucidates on his immigrant roots, his take on the government, his brush with death, and how the stories he feels compelled to compose transcend the genre of rock and roll. Escovedo will be strumming alongside Texan legend Joe Ely at Ardmore Music Hall on August 19th, 2017.

In Search of the Maya World: From Central America to Philadelphia

 06/27/2017 - 14:26
Gallery of archaeological pieces of Mayan culture exhibited at the Museum of Archeology and Anthropology of the University of Pennsylvania. Photo: Supplied UPEnn

One of the most intriguing mysteries of Latin American culture is what happened to the Maya civilization. How come after over 3,000 years of history, from about 2, 500 BC to 950 AD, most of the glorious Maya centers in Mesoamerica were abandoned? Before the arrival of the Europeans in the 1500’s magnificent cities like Tikal in Guatemala and Copán in Honduras had all but disappeared; left uninhabited, they were covered by thick jungle growth, hidden throughout the mountains and the lowlands. 

Author: 

[OP-ED]: Trump isn’t destiny

 06/13/2017 - 15:17
To some extent, the future of America depends on Donald Trump. But it depends even more on how these social and economic trends evolve -- how we cope with them and whether we become a more cohesive society or a more contentious one. EFE

 It’s time to take a brief break from Donald Trump. Whatever you think of him, there’s no denying that he dominates the news cycle. We seem to assume that the nation’s future depends on Trump’s fate, for better or worse. The reality is otherwise: The nation’s future also hangs on larger economic and social trends that no president can shape.

[OP-ED]: The bumpy road to adulthood

 04/27/2017 - 14:43
The Great Recession’s high unemployment surely drove many young people back to their parents. The actual number of 18- to 34-year-olds living at home totaled 24 million in 2015. Two-thirds say they’re happy with their home life. The fact that more Americans go to college and graduate school than in the past has also delayed marriage, living independently and having children.

Growing up isn’t what it used to be. There’s a yawning gap between the end of adolescence and the beginning of adulthood: a period when millions of 20-somethings and 30-somethings have many adult freedoms without all the responsibilities. Social scientists have tried -- so far in vain -- to name this new life-stage, but no one should question its significance.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: Is the American Dream killing us?

 04/04/2017 - 10:31
One theory attributes the spike in “deaths of despair” to growing income inequality. There would be fewer suicides, drug overdoses and alcohol-related deaths if incomes were distributed more equally, the argument goes. People take out their frustrations and anger by resorting to self-destructive behavior.

It isn’t often that economics raises the most profound questions of human existence, but recent work of economists Anne Case and Angus Deaton (husband and wife, both of Princeton University) comes close. You may recall that a few years ago, Case and Deaton reported the startling finding that the death rates of non-Hispanic middle-aged whites had gotten worse — they were dying younger.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: Who’s hoarding the American Dream?

 07/18/2017 - 15:54
“Upper-middle-class parents have the means to spend two to three times more time with their preschool children than less affluent parents,” he wrote. He also excoriated “the structural ways the well-educated rig the system” -- mainly restrictive zoning and easier college admissions, including legacy preferences. impakter.com

To hear Richard Reeves tell it, the upper middle class is fast becoming the bane of American society. Its members have entrenched themselves just below the top 1 percent and protect their privileged position through public policy and private behavior. Americans cherish the belief that they live in a mobile society, where hard work and imagination are rewarded. The upper middle class is destroying this faith, because it’s impeding poorer Americans from getting ahead.

Peace on Earth

 07/13/2015 - 14:06
More famB 1280x-g0" by Rowland Lockey - Nostell Priory, nr. Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Los católicos celebran la fiesta de santo Tomás Moro, el gran estadista inglés y mártir, el 22 de junio. Pero la fecha real de su ejecución fue hace 480 años el 6 de julio, en el 1535. Enrique VIII mandó a decapitarlo dos semanas después del asesinato judicial de su amigo y obispo de Rochester, san Juan Fisher.

Plain Text Author: 
Sabrina Vourvoulias

Persecution Under the Radar

 12/05/2010 - 15:36
Persecution Under the Radar

Picture the Islamic Republic of Iran. What comes to mind? For the
average American it may be nuclear proliferation, the bombastic President
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, maybe Persian rugs, but not much else. Certainly seven
regular, middle-class people who have been imprisoned for quietly practicing
the Baha'i religion haven't made it onto our radars.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda