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Las consecuencias de la postura y de las acciones de Trump son difíciles de prever. Podrían resultar en el lento deterioro del orden internacional liberal. Podrían significar el auge de un orden nuevo y no tan liberal, promovido por China e India, ambos países mercantilistas y nacionalistas. EFE

We now have a Trump Doctrine, and it is, in its conception at least, the most radical departure from a bipartisan American foreign policy since 1945. In an op-ed for The Wall Street Journal, National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn and national security adviser H.R. McMaster explain that President Trump has “a clear-eyed outlook that the world is not a ‘global community’ but an arena where nations, nongovernmental actors and businesses engage and compete for advantage.”

[OP-ED]: Amid Trump’s chaos, a post-American world emerges

 08/01/2017 - 09:10
In 2008, I wrote a book about the emerging “Post-American World,” which was, I noted at the start, not about the decline of America but rather the rise of the rest. Amid the parochialism, ineptitude and sheer disarray of the Trump presidency, the post-American world is coming to fruition much faster than I ever expected.

 In London last week, I met a Nigerian man who succinctly expressed the reaction of much of the world to America these days. “Your country has gone crazy,” he said, with a mixture of outrage and amusement. “I’m from Africa. I know crazy, but I didn’t ever think I would see this in America!”

[OP-ED]: Donald Trump’s lost opportunity

 07/26/2017 - 09:12
Donald Trump could have quickly begun reshaping American politics. He heard voices that others didn’t, understood what those people wanted to hear and articulated much of it. But when it came time to deliver, it turned out that he had no serious ideas, policies, nor even the desire to search for them. EFE

There are many ways to evaluate the Trump presidency at the six-month mark. What I am struck by is the path not taken, the lost opportunity. Donald Trump had many flaws, but during the campaign, he tapped into a real set of problems facing America and a deep frustration with the existing political system. Additionally, he embraced and expressed -- somewhat inconsistently -- a populism that went beyond the traditional left-right divide. What would things look like at this point if President Trump had governed in the manner of a pragmatic, jobs-oriented reformer who was relentlessly focused on the “forgotten” Americans of whom he often speaks?

[OP-ED]: Trump’s trade trap

 07/11/2017 - 15:30
Trump may believe that trade and environmental issues can be kept separate from geopolitical matters, such as North Korea’s nuclear program. On the contrary, history suggests that trade and geopolitics go hand in hand. EFE

Donald Trump’s foreign policy, such as it is, rests on a massive and apparently indestructible contradiction. Trump wants the United States to remain the “essential” nation, the best embodiment of Western ideals of freedom and democracy, while at the same time deliberately alienating many of our traditional “allies,” whose support the United States desperately needs. American leadership becomes difficult, if not impossible.

[OP-ED]: The messy reality of global warming

 06/07/2017 - 10:10
Based on present technology and knowledge, we don’t know how to solve global warming. There is no obvious way to eliminate our pervasive dependence on fossil fuels without plunging the world into a prolonged depression and inviting widespread civil strife. 

There was no need for President Trump to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate agreement to achieve his goal of overturning the Obama administration’s global warming policy. This had already occurred through court rulings and executive orders, which effectively halted higher vehicle fuel economy standards (up to 54.5 miles per gallon) and ended the Clean Power Plan program, which pushed electric utilities to shift away from coal.

[OP-ED]: Trump’s radical doctrine of retreat

 06/06/2017 - 16:54
Las consecuencias de la postura y de las acciones de Trump son difíciles de prever. Podrían resultar en el lento deterioro del orden internacional liberal. Podrían significar el auge de un orden nuevo y no tan liberal, promovido por China e India, ambos países mercantilistas y nacionalistas. EFE

We now have a Trump Doctrine, and it is, in its conception at least, the most radical departure from a bipartisan American foreign policy since 1945. In an op-ed for The Wall Street Journal, National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn and national security adviser H.R. McMaster explain that President Trump has “a clear-eyed outlook that the world is not a ‘global community’ but an arena where nations, nongovernmental actors and businesses engage and compete for advantage.”

[OP-ED]: How Saudi Arabia played Donald Trump

 05/30/2017 - 17:12
Leaked German intelligence reports show that charities “closely connected with government offices” of Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Kuwait are funding mosques, schools and imams to disseminate a fundamentalist, intolerant version of Islam throughout Germany. EFE

This week’s bombing in Manchester was another gruesome reminder that the threat from radical Islamic terrorism is ongoing. And President Trump’s journey to the Middle East illustrated yet again how the country central to the spread of this terrorism, Saudi Arabia, has managed to evade and deflect any responsibility for it. In fact, Trump has given Saudi Arabia a free pass and a free hand in the region.

Plain Text Author: 
Fareed Zakaria

OP-ED]: Trump is hurting America’s friends abroad

 05/10/2017 - 09:26
t is now quite possible -- in fact, likely -- that the next president of Mexico will be an anti-American socialist-populist similar to Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez. Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador was polling around 10 percent at the start of 2015. He is now around 30 percent, the front-runner among the potential candidates for next year’s election. File

There has been much focus on Donald Trump’s erratic foreign policy -- the outlandish positions, the many flip-flops, the mistakes. But far more damaging in the long run might be what some have termed the Trump effect -- the impact of Trump on the domestic politics of other countries. That effect appears to be powerful, negative and enduring. It could undermine decades of American foreign policy successes.

Plain Text Author: 
Fareed Zakaria

[OP-ED]: Trump’s stock boom -- illusion or reality?

 04/25/2017 - 10:10
Stock valuations are tricky. With hindsight, the market can stay above or below levels reflecting economic fundamentals for long stretches. Whatever the case today, stocks are nowhere near the absurd heights of the “tech bubble” at the turn of the century. EFE

The last thing President Trump now needs is for the stock market to go south on him. After all, he’s got worries aplenty: abroad, North Korea, Syria, Russia and Brexit; at home, the stalled effort to repeal Obamacare; and uncertainty surrounding “tax reform.” Compared with this tapestry of troubles, the stock market has been a splendid blessing.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

5 Times more Venezuelans emigrating to Brazil to escape crisis, HRW reports

 04/19/2017 - 03:36
A girl of the Venezuelan Warao tribe washing clothes with her mother outside a shelter in Boa Vista, Brazil, on February 11, 2017. EFE/HRW/CESAR MUÑOZ ACEBES

 The Human Rights Watch (HRW) organization said in a report Tuesday that since 2014, five times the number of Venezuelans are emigrating to Brazil due to shortages of food and medicine in their own country, an example of how Venezuela"s humanitarian crisis is spilling across its borders.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

Senators confirm they will question Trump's son-in-law in Russia probe

 03/30/2017 - 04:09
Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Republican Richard Burr (R) and ranking member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Democrat Mark Warner (L) hold a news conference on the committee's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, USA, 29 March 2017. EPA/MICHAEL REYNOLDS

The heads of the Senate Intelligence Committee confirmed Wednesday that they will question Jared Kushner, the son-in-law of President Donald Trump, in their investigation into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 elections and Moscow's possible links with the magnate's campaign.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

[OP-ED]: Retreat at Mar-a-Lago: Passing the baton to China

 03/22/2017 - 08:31
El primer ministro chino dijo que China está comprometida con la apertura de su economía, aunque el proceso se llevará a cabo gradualmente.

We do not yet have the official agenda for next month’s meeting at Mar-a-Lago between Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping. But after 75 years of American leadership on the world stage, we might be watching the beginning of a handover of power from the United States to China.

Plain Text Author: 
Fareed Zakaria

[OP-ED]: Retiro en Mar-a-Lago: Pasando la batuta a China

 03/22/2017 - 08:26
El primer ministro chino dijo que China está comprometida con la apertura de su economía, aunque el proceso se llevará a cabo gradualmente.

Todavía no tenemos la agenda oficial para el encuentro del próximo mes en Mar-a-Lago entre Donald Trump y el presidente chino Xi Jinping. Pero luego de 75 años de liderazgo estadounidense en el escenario mundial, tal vez estemos siendo testigos del comienzo de una transferencia de poder de Estados Unidos a China.

Plain Text Author: 
Fareed Zakaria

[OP-ED]: Trump is beginning to reverse 70 years of American foreign policy

 02/01/2017 - 06:58
In his first days in office, Donald Trump has begun to reverse the domestic policies of the previous eight years. But with regard to America’s relations with the world, Trump seems far more radical. In word and deed, he appears to be walking away from the idea of America at the center of an open, rule- based international order. This would be a reversal of more than 70 years of American foreign policy. EFE
 

In an essay in The New York Review of Books, Jessica Mathews points out that since 1945, Americans of both political parties have accepted three principles. First, that America’s security is enhanced by its broad and deep alliances around the world. Second, that an open global economy is not a zero-sum game but rather allows America to prosper and others to grow. And finally, while there was debate about whether dictatorships were to be “tolerated, managed, or confronted,” in the end there was a faith in democracy and its advantages.

Plain Text Author: 
Fareed Zakaria