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"Not Welcome Here": Trump Lands in Brussels to attend NATO Summit Amid Protests

 05/25/2017 - 05:56
US President Donald J. Trump (R) and US First Lady Melania Trump (L) wave as they board the 'Air Force One' plane at the 'Leonardo da Vinci' airport in Fiumicino, near Rome, Italy, 24 May 2017, on their way to Brussels, the next leg of his first presidential tour. EPA/ANGELO CARCONI

Thousands of protesters welcomed the US President in a city he once called a “hellhole”. Trump is meeting with leaders of European Union and the NATO military alliance to discuss a new joint coalition to fight Islamic Terrorism. He has been critical of both blocs.

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Why EPA has dismissed half of its key board’s scientific advisers?

 05/10/2017 - 04:10
Scott Pruitt, the EPA administrator, has chosen not to renew the terms of nine of the 18-member board of scientific counselors, which advises the EPA on the quality and accuracy of the science it produces. Photo: Wikipedia

Nine scientists have been dismissed from the EPA’s 18-person Board of Scientific Counselors—ostensibly to include more voices from regulated industries, though the scientists say their work was apolitical and did not involve regulations. The US government has also postponed an important meeting scheduled for Tuesday to determine whether the country should or should not withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change, a matter that President Donald Trump promised to decide this month.

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How Cubans deal with the worst drought in a century

 04/10/2017 - 05:59
Two people filling containers with water at a neighbor's house, in the province of Ciego de Avila, Cuba on Apr. 3, 2017. EFE/Alejandro Ernesto

Cuba is undergoing one of the worst droughts in over a century, which this year has principally struck the central regions of Ciego de Avila, Sancti Spiritus and Camaguey, where the critical state of the aquifers not only affects the population, but also agriculture, which has had to be shifted to dryland farming.

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EFE

Disaster in Colombia

 04/03/2017 - 02:32
Residents of Mocoa, Colombia, move among the city's ruins on April 2, 2017, after a mudslide wiped away portions of 17 neighborhoods, killing more than 200 people. EFE/LEONARDO MUÑOZ

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos confirmed Sunday that at least 210 people died and 203 were injured in the mudslides that buried or wiped away part of the city of Mocoa, promising that the southern jungle city will be rebuilt.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

[OP-ED]: Is your phone eavesdropping on your conversation about cannibalism? Mine may have.

 03/08/2017 - 18:41

Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

If you were to read biology professor Bill Schutt’s new book “Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,” you’d have lots to talk about at the dinner table.

There are, for instance, sections on how cannibalism is portrayed in popular culture, news stories and historical texts. Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: Who’s afraid of the ‘administrative state’?

 03/07/2017 - 15:28
It’s time to make the administrative state a mainstream concept, through the creation of a regulatory budget. The point is not to justify the instant repeal of most rules, as Bannon’s critics fear, but to improve understanding and accountability.

Just what White House chief strategist Stephen Bannon meant when he recently suggested “deconstructing the administrative state” is unclear. To critics, he would gut the whole superstructure of social and environmental safeguards, starting with the Environmental Protection Agency (which, say news reports, may face a staff cut of one-fifth). But regardless of Bannon’s meaning, the relentless growth of the administrative state is a reality that we can’t escape.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: The Age of Disbelief

 02/28/2017 - 16:14
There are plenty of skeptics -- including me -- who think Trump’s agenda is largely impractical or undesirable. To take one example: Since at least John F. Kennedy, presidents have pledged to increase economic growth.

We live in an age of disbelief. Many of the ideas and institutions that have underpinned Americans’ thinking since the early years after World War II are besieged. There is an intellectual and political vacuum into which rush new figures (Donald Trump) and different ideas (America First). These new ideas and leaders may be no better than the ones they displace -- they may, in fact, be worse -- but they have the virtue of being new.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: Two cheers for a carbon tax

 02/19/2017 - 20:55

Fossil fuels now supply four-fifths of the world’s energy, a share that has dropped only slightly since 1990. To stabilize CO2 concentrations, we must essentially stop burning fossil fuels. How is this to happen? Supporters of a carbon tax hope that the market mechanism -- higher prices for fossil fuels -- will unleash a torrent of innovation: safer nuclear, less costly solar, better batteries. This is a leap of faith. Higher prices do not guarantee technological breakthroughs.
 

By all means, let’s have a carbon tax. It’s the best way to deal with global climate change. It would require Republicans and Democrats to compromise -- a good thing -- and would provide revenues for a government that desperately needs more revenue. Fine. But let’s not pretend that a carbon tax is a panacea for either climate change or too much debt.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

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