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EL PASO, TEXAS - FEBRUARY 01: Central American immigrants walk along the border fence after crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico on February 01, 2019 in El Paso, Texas. The migrants later turned themselves in to U.S. Border Patrol agents, seeking political asylum in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

There has been an explosion of apprehension of family units from Central America during the Trump presidency and this is leading to great strain on the system.

OP-ED]: Trump is hurting America’s friends abroad

 05/10/2017 - 09:26
t is now quite possible -- in fact, likely -- that the next president of Mexico will be an anti-American socialist-populist similar to Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez. Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador was polling around 10 percent at the start of 2015. He is now around 30 percent, the front-runner among the potential candidates for next year’s election. File

There has been much focus on Donald Trump’s erratic foreign policy -- the outlandish positions, the many flip-flops, the mistakes. But far more damaging in the long run might be what some have termed the Trump effect -- the impact of Trump on the domestic politics of other countries. That effect appears to be powerful, negative and enduring. It could undermine decades of American foreign policy successes.

Plain Text Author: 
Fareed Zakaria

US to prosecute parents who pay "coyotes" to ferry kids over border

 04/21/2017 - 03:50
US Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks next to US Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly during a press conference in El Paso, Texas, United States, Apr. 20, 2017. EFE/Luis Pablo Hernandez

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly and Attorney General Jeff Sessions promised Thursday to prosecute parents who pay people-traffickers to help their children illegally cross the border into the US from Mexico and confirmed that the White House is still committed to build a wall along the two countries

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

Honduran woman saves herself, family from violent extortion gang

 04/12/2017 - 07:42
Undated photo provided on Apr. 11, 2017 showing 37-year-old Honduran citizen Carolina, who fled from their native Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital, because for over a year Barrio 18 members had demanded more and more protection money every week to "watch over your business." EFE/Sashenka Gutierrez

Carolina and her family fled from their native Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital, because for over a year Barrio 18 members had demanded more and more protection money every week to "watch over your business."Their original destination had been the United States until Donald Trump's arrival in the White House temporarily put the brakes on that idea.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

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