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[OP-ED]: How Saudi Arabia played Donald Trump

 05/30/2017 - 17:12
Leaked German intelligence reports show that charities “closely connected with government offices” of Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Kuwait are funding mosques, schools and imams to disseminate a fundamentalist, intolerant version of Islam throughout Germany. EFE

This week’s bombing in Manchester was another gruesome reminder that the threat from radical Islamic terrorism is ongoing. And President Trump’s journey to the Middle East illustrated yet again how the country central to the spread of this terrorism, Saudi Arabia, has managed to evade and deflect any responsibility for it. In fact, Trump has given Saudi Arabia a free pass and a free hand in the region.

Plain Text Author: 
Fareed Zakaria

Shattered: New Book Brutalizes Hillary Clinton's Campaign

 04/24/2017 - 03:41
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaking with supporters at a "Get Out the Caucus" rally at Valley Southwoods Freshman High School in West Des Moines, Iowa, on 24 January 2016. Source: Wikimedia

In “Shattered,”  journalists Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes portrait Clinton's campaign as a Titanic-like disaster: an epic fail made up of a series of perverse and often avoidable missteps by an out-of-touch candidate and her strife-ridden staff that turned “a winnable race” into “another iceberg-seeking campaign ship.”

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Ante la duda, lea un libro

 04/20/2017 - 06:42
Imagen de la Diada de Sant Jordi, una celebración que se celebra cada 23 de abril en Barcelona y el resto de Catalunya. La tradición manda que el hombre regale una rosa a su amada, y ella le compre un libro. Con el tiempo, esta popular tradición ha acabado dando lugar al Día Mundial del Libro. Foto: Flickr.

El 23 de Abril se celebra el Día Mundial del Libro, coincidiendo con la fecha de la muerte de Cervantes y Shakespeare. La celebración tiene su origen en la fiesta de Sant Jordi, una tradición centenaria catalana que ha ido popularizándose con el tiempo, en la que los enamorados se regalan un libro y una rosa respectivamente. 

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Philly Grows Into Its Anarchist Shoe

 03/29/2017 - 09:18
Wooden Shoe es una librería que encierra una atmósfera distinta a la de otros establecimientos dedicados a la venta de libros, aquí el enfoque es colaborativo y político. La librería está ubicada en el 704 South Street.  Foto Archivo Particular.

Past a chalkboard that says, “Come inside to read a good book,” on one side and “Don’t be an asshole!” on the other, you come across a tattered SEPTA Union Strike poster from the early twentieth century, preserved underneath an equally withered-away lamination. A few cautious inches deep inside of this surreal time machine, a pillar manages to stand from the 1890s home of an anarchist feminist writer and speaker who lived near Drexel University.

Who wants to study Spanish in Philadelphia?

 03/28/2017 - 16:30
María Paredes Fernández, profesora de español en Penn University, fue nominada el año pasado como “mejor profesora de español de EEUU”, por la Asociación Americana de Profesores de Español y Portugués (AATSP). Foto: Peter Fitzpatrick

The Hispanic immigrant community has played a fundamental role in the growth of the city in the last decade. In the streets it is more and more common to hear conversations held in Spanish. However, it seems that this important trend is not reflected in universities. Why? A general crisis in the study of the humanities would be the answer. AL DÍA News spoke with professors from three of the most prominent universities in the city.

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Wooden Shoe books: El zapato anarquista de Filadelfia

 03/28/2017 - 12:17
Wooden Shoe es una librería que encierra una atmósfera distinta a la de otros establecimientos dedicados a la venta de libros, aquí el enfoque es colaborativo y político. La librería está ubicada en el 704 South Street.  Foto Archivo Particular.

Dejando atrás una pizarra en la que se lee a un lado “Entre y lea un buen libro” y “¡No sea estúpido!” en el otro, me encuentro con un poster viejo y andrajoso de una huelga convocada por el sindicato de la SEPTA a principios del siglo pasado, conservado gracias a un laminado igualmente marchito. A unos pocos centímetros de esta máquina del tiempo surrealista, topo con una columna de una casa de 1890 en la que en su día vivió una conocida escritora anarquista y feminista, cerca de la Universidad Drexel.  

[OP-ED]: Who’s afraid of the ‘administrative state’?

 03/07/2017 - 15:28
It’s time to make the administrative state a mainstream concept, through the creation of a regulatory budget. The point is not to justify the instant repeal of most rules, as Bannon’s critics fear, but to improve understanding and accountability.

Just what White House chief strategist Stephen Bannon meant when he recently suggested “deconstructing the administrative state” is unclear. To critics, he would gut the whole superstructure of social and environmental safeguards, starting with the Environmental Protection Agency (which, say news reports, may face a staff cut of one-fifth). But regardless of Bannon’s meaning, the relentless growth of the administrative state is a reality that we can’t escape.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

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