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Tissue culture laboratory, image to illustrate note on Kamal Ranadive

Ranadive is responsible for several studies on the prevention and treatment of cancer today.

Could a Mathematical Formula stop the extinction of species?

 07/26/2017 - 07:11
Hugh Possingham, chief scientist of the NGO The Nature Conservancy, who presented in Colombia this week a controversial mathematical formula that measures the cost-benefit of saving different species, in order to decide which should be given priority. EFE/NGO The Nature Conservancy

Math has already been used effectively in defining protected areas in places with productive activities in 150 countries over the past 15 years. The best example of that application is Australia's Great Barrier Reef, where a software called Marxan permitted the expansion of protected areas from 5 percent to 35 percent while preserving species and improving fishing. 

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

[OP-ED]: Is your phone eavesdropping on your conversation about cannibalism? Mine may have.

 03/08/2017 - 18:41

Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

If you were to read biology professor Bill Schutt’s new book “Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,” you’d have lots to talk about at the dinner table.

There are, for instance, sections on how cannibalism is portrayed in popular culture, news stories and historical texts. Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda