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Local and International Latino artists bring sabor to Taller Puertorriqueno's Art Gallery

Wed, 05/31/2017 - 3:20pm -- Peter Fitzpatrick
"Something Beautiful" from artist Marcos Dimas combines Pre-Colombian Taino Symbols with abstract figures as a sign of the merging of the past and present. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DIA News
"Zenit 1.0" by artist Jose Ortiz-Pagan uses industrial materials with the concept of how people are attached to material objects. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DIA News
The "Tribute to Chico Mendes" by Doris Nogueira-Rogers was made in tribute to the Brazilian activist who was killed trying to protect the Amazonian Rainforest. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DIA News
"La Croqueta De Dona Julia" by Myrna Baez is one of a group of works that reject American Abstract art which was dominant when Puerto Rico became a commonwealth territory of the United States. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DIA News
Alexis Duque painting, "Home" uses a style of stacking of this interior to mimic something architectural. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DIA News
Michelle Ortiz' First in this series of four light boxes, "Amado for los dioses" is considered a self portrait of the artist. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DIA News
Michelle Ortiz' Second in this series of four light boxes, "No siege protegiendo" is a portrait of her paternal grandfather. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DIA News
Michelle Ortiz' Third in this series of four light boxes, "Camina con los guerros" is a portrait of her husband and son. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DIA News
Michelle Ortiz' Fourth in this series of four light boxes, "She loves us all the same" is a portrait of her mother and the necklace with her siblings. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DIA News
The first of two pieces entitled "Neo Boriken" was based on her tile mosaic that was commissioned by the Metropolitan Transit Authority in New York City in 1990. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DIA News
The meaning of "Neo Boriken" is too be a guide through the streets and subways of New York City capturing the energy and rhythms of the neighborhoods. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DIA News
This acrylic painting on wood entitled "Morivivi" is titled after the touch-me not flower. The fedora the son wears is similar to the one worn by Ortiz' paternal grandfather. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DIA News