LIVE STREAMING
Women’s March in Washington, June 28, 2018. Photo: Kyle O’Leary.
Women’s March in Washington, D.C. June 28, 2018. Photo: Kyle O’Leary.

Women march in Washington streets to protest zero-tolerance policy

On Thursday, thousands of women returned to the streets across the country to protest against family separation measures imposed by the Donald Trump government.

MORE IN THIS SECTION

The boom of Bolivian cinema

June 25th, 2022

Colombian leader at NASA

June 24th, 2022

Philly Rallies for Roe

June 24th, 2022

"Roe is on the ballot"

June 24th, 2022

Abortion hits home in PA

June 24th, 2022

Abortion Bans Come Quick

June 24th, 2022

PA+Philly React to No Roe

June 24th, 2022

The face of Philly tourism

June 24th, 2022

SHARE THIS CONTENT:

If this government has achieved something impeccably, it is giving new strength to protest and civil disobedience.

After more than a year of taking the streets of the country in protest against the inauguration of a misogynist and divisionist president, the movement that originated with the Women's March took to the streets again on Thursday in a "massive act of civil disobedience" to respond to the "cruel and immoral" policy of zero tolerance, reported The Guardian.

"The mothers, sisters, wives, and daughters of America will not stand down until the imprisoned children are released and reunited with their families," the report quotes. "And we will not stay silent as federal enforcers indefinitely incarcerate whole families in the detention camps."

This protest is the latest manifestation of popular discontent after Attorney General Jeff Sessions instituted a policy of zero tolerance for undocumented immigration across the country's southern border, where the immediate prosecution of adults led to the separation of thousands of families that had entered together to request asylum in the country.  

After arduous criticism from international human rights organizations and widespread discontent in the nation, the government finally decided not to separate families when they were prosecuted, but to keep them indefinitely imprisoned.

Furthermore, the Department of Homeland Security announced that it would initiate measures to reunite the more than 2,000 children separated from their parents, but did not specify the procedure for it. In addition, a federal judge in San Diego decided on a period of 14 days for the government to reunite children under 5 with their parents, but the media and activists warn that many of the children are distributed throughout the national territory and that the feat will be much more difficult than it seems.

That is why organizations like the Women's March have decided to take to the streets and exert even more social pressure to make the government understand that this will not go unnoticed by their promises.

"We will put our bodies on the line to demand an end to the Trump Administration’s ‘zero-tolerance’ policy that automatically criminalizes undocumented immigrants," the organization announced. "We will put our bodies on the line to demand the safety and freedom of children being held in detention centers across the country. And we will put our bodies on the line until Congress sets in motion a plan to abolish the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency."

Protesters took to the streets blocking traffic and moved to the Hart Senate Office Building in Washington D.C., where 50 senators have offices.

  • LEAVE A COMMENT:

  • Join the discussion! Leave a comment.

  • or
  • REGISTER
  • to comment.
  • LEAVE A COMMENT:

  • Join the discussion! Leave a comment.

  • or
  • REGISTER
  • to comment.
00:00 / 00:00
Ads destiny link