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Native American activist Lydia Ponce (C) joins thousands of protesters at the third annual Women's March in Los Angeles, California, USA. On January 19, 2019. EFE/EPA/EUGENE GARCIA
Native American activist Lydia Ponce (C) joins thousands of protesters at the third annual Women's March in Los Angeles, California, USA. On January 19, 2019. EFE/EPA/EUGENE GARCIA

Women’s March, when unrest is heavier than controversy

In the midst of the longest government shutdown in history and anti-Semitic controversies, the Women's March was held for the third consecutive year and proved…

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It seems like only yesterday that Donald Trump was inaugurated as president before a brief audience, while hundreds of thousands of people organized to march in the streets against the misogyny that was now moving into the White House.

Donald Trump not only had beaten an opponent through a campaign of contempt and a speech against political correctness but also had won the Electoral College vote even when his positions attacked dozens of communities and minorities in the country.

On January 21, 2017, and before the alarming change in the leadership of the nation, the citizens took to the streets to demand respect for women, the LGBTQ community, and immigrants, three mainstays that were threatened by the arrival of the new president.

Two years later, there is little hope that something could really change for the sake of the country, and the March charged down.

Although this year's participation was considerably lower - some 100,000 people, according to media estimates - neither the cold nor the controversy over the alleged expulsion of the organizer of the first march because of her Jewish identity broke the spirit of the demonstrators.

Organizations such as the Democratic National Committee, the Southern Poverty Law Center, March On, and the Women's March Alliance held similar and simultaneous concentrations, despite having distanced themselves from the main organization due to the internal problems, and most of the participants decided not to make a distinction because the feeling remains one: to fight against the government’s policies.

According to Vanessa Wruble - executive director of March On and co-founder of the first Women's March in Washington) – the goal this year was to prevent controversy from intervening in the real driving force behind the movement. "Everyone should march. Doesn’t matter where you march, just march," she told Vox.

She also added that the phenomenon behind the March goes much further: "a lot of people have turned from a reactive position of marching to a proactive position of either running for office or volunteering for a campaign or focusing on registering people to vote.”

An example of this was, once again, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest representative to be elected to a seat in Congress, and who has decided to "shake the table” since the midterm elections.

Her speech at the New York march was one of the most powerful in the event, according to The Cut, and moved the shared sentiment that the need to change the country is stronger than any internal controversy.

"Are you all ready to make a ruckus?" She asked. "Are you all ready to fight for our rights? Are you all ready to say that in the United States of America everyone is loved, everyone deserves justice, and everyone deserves equal protection and prosperity in our country?"

The unanimous response of the country seems to be "Yes.”

Ocasio-Cortez summarized the importance of closing flanks and facing the reality of the country as a much bigger issue than inner differences.

"Let us remember that a fight means no person left behind," she said. "Because this is not just about identity, this is about justice. And this is about the America that we are going to bring into this world."

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