LIVE STREAMING
Jack Gavin, of West Caldwell, New Jersey, poses with some of the buttons he gave during a rally to get the vote. EFE / JUSTIN LANE
Jack Gavin, of West Caldwell, New Jersey, poses with some of the buttons he gave during a rally to get the vote. EFE / JUSTIN LANE

5 key points to understand the midterm elections

Between the new control of the House by the Democrats and Republicans holding the Senate, there are many important factors of these elections. Here is…

MORE IN THIS SECTION

SHARE THIS CONTENT:

This is the calm after the storm.

After months of intense political campaigns and turbulent moods, the midterm elections have come to an end, and the results are clear: a large part of the country wants to change the way politics are done in the United States.

Wednesday morning has been divided between a president who claims to have won the election and a Democratic Party that claims to have achieved their goals.

What really happened?
The Democrats did not expect to win the Senate

Let's make something clear: the Blue Wave was not about retaking the whole Congress. It was clear from the beginning that winning a majority in the Senate was impossible for Democrats, considering that the seats opened to the election were only 35 of the 100 that make up the Upper House, of which the Republicans had to defend only nine.

According to Vox, the Democratic Party had an important "disadvantage" on the Senate map from the beginning, where 10 Democratic senators competed for re-election "in states where Donald Trump won in 2016."

The Blue Wave is a Reality

The fundamental goal of the Democratic Party was to retake the House of Representatives during this midterm election, and that is precisely what they did.

Of the 435 seats available in the House, the Democrats got 219, getting, in the words of the Washington Post, "a seat at the table in Washington."

Up to this point, the Republican majority had sidelined the Democratic voice in the national legislative discussions. With a majority in the House of Representatives, Democrats now have the possibility to put a stop to the unbridled decisions made by the Trump Administration under the protection of their party.

The Democratic Party is now the Party of Diversity

The real conclusion of these elections is that the great strength of the national demography was present in the polling stations.

Among LGBTQ candidates, Muslim, Native American and, fundamentally, women, the Democratic caucus is now the most diverse in the history of the country.

Victories such as those of Ayanna Pressley in Massachusetts, Sylvia García and Verónica Escobar in Texas, Ilhan Omar in Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib in Michigan, are just some of the evidence of a profound change in national politics.

Women are the true champions

The elections on Tuesday marked a historic record in the number of women elected to represent their citizens.

According to Axios, these elections have marked a milestone in American politics, after 40 women of color were elected to the House; Tennessee has its first senator, South Dakota and Maine chose their first female governors, Michelle Lujan Grisham became the first Latina Democrat to be elected as governor, and 33 of the races for Congress were debated between two women.

It is also the first time that "more women registered to vote than men," radically reducing, for the first time, the difference in participation between both genders.

A forecast of chaos

Ultimately, the radical polarization of the Congress will bring two years of deep differences, where the Democrats will insist on opposing the anti-immigrant measures of the Trump Administration, and will have to face a Senate focused on solidifying its power in the Supreme Court, ensuring that the decisions of the White House have a carte blanche at a legislative level.

  • LEAVE A COMMENT:

  • Join the discussion! Leave a comment.

  • or
  • REGISTER
  • to comment.
  • LEAVE A COMMENT:

  • Join the discussion! Leave a comment.

  • or
  • REGISTER
  • to comment.
00:00 / 00:00
Ads destiny link