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Two Legitimate Concerns in Honduras

Honduras has two presidents, two groups supporting each, yet at the heart of this problem and far more troubling, Hondurans have two legitimate concerns.

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COMPARTA ESTE CONTENIDO:

Honduras has two presidents, two groups supporting each, yet at the heart of this problem and far more troubling, Hondurans have two legitimate concerns.

 

On one hand there is the fear regarding that a president, even one originally democratically elected, finds ways to perpetuate himself in power via amendments to the Constitution, as it is already becoming the practice in Latin America, and precisely what deposed president Manuel Zelaya actively sought to achieve.

On the other hand there is also the legitimate concern against the return of the ghost of dictatorships that so much harmed the whole continent leaving it deeply scared.

Much of this first valid concern is the camaraderie of Zelaya with Chávez, joining together as part of the so called XXI Century Socialism, with ALBA a group of nations again under the leadership of the same Venezuelan president.

It smells like Chavez, it even seems that Chavez monies were involved, and that certainly frightens nations that do not feed on the populist tale; even less convinced might be a country like Honduras lacking oil revenues or anything similar in order to fund populist policies.

CONTENIDO RELACIONADO

On Referendum day, June 28, in which Hondurans were disposed to vote on whether they would allow their Constitution to be amended in order to enable presidential reelection, we witnessed instead a military coup d’état.

The expression alone frightens us; thus the chain reaction of all international organizations and governments condemning it, earnestly conjuring to reverse such disruption.  It would have been a mistake not to condemn it; the international community didn’t even address the fact that Zelaya had a share of responsibility in the present crisis.

Nevertheless only Hondurans know which of their two fears will be worse, only they would know but hardly anyone discusses this very issue.

Zelaya chose to ignore the Honduran Judiciary and Congress, which rejected his referendum considering it unconstitutional, he even fired the military chief who refused to provide the logistics for that referendum.  His vice-president Roberto Micheletti along with congressmen from his own party seized power, arguing some Constitutional technicality, and ousted Zelaya with the support of the military that stormed into the Presidential Palace, chasing away a democratically elected president Zelaya in his pajamas… a vintage Latin American coup d’état.

There were two illegalities, both “presidents” sinned, but only Hondurans shall know whether the “medicine” to fight a legitimate fear will result worse than the feared illness it intends to fight.

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