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The Fallout: Trump faces growing backlash over comments about Charlottesville

 08/17/2017 - 04:36
 The president of the United States, Donald Trump, chairing a meeting of a business advisory council. Trump dissolved two of these councils on Aug. 16, 2017, after several chief executive officers quit over his remarks about last weekend's violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. EFE

The President dissolved two business adversary councils on Wednesday after several chief executive officers quit over his remarks about last weekend"s violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. Trump's remarks als sparked condemnation from his fellow Republicans, including two Bush presidents, who issued an statement condemning 'racial bigotry'. 

Plain Text Author: 
Andrea Rodés/Agencies

[OP-ED]: The Art of the Bluff

 08/15/2017 - 15:13
Trump has made clear that the United States would respond to North Korean nuclear threats with a massive military strike, possibly involving nuclear weapons. EFE

How did we get here? Why does it appear that we’re on the brink of a war in Asia, one that could involve nuclear weapons? North Korea has had nuclear-weapons capacity for at least 10 years now. Have its recent advances been so dramatic and significant to force the United States to wage a preventive war? No. The crisis we now find ourselves in has been exaggerated and mishandled by the Trump administration to a degree that is deeply worrying and dangerous.

[OP-ED]: El gran debate de Trump sobre el crecimiento económico

 08/15/2017 - 10:01
No hay suficiente dinero para satisfacer todas nuestras demandas, incluso a tasas más altas de crecimiento económico. Habrá conflictos entre gastos privados y gubernamentales; entre gastos nacionales y locales; entre gastos de salud y gastos de no-salud; y entre gastos dedicados a los ancianos versus los jóvenes. El presente es polémico; el futuro quizás sea peor.

La discusión entre el gobierno de Trump y sus críticos sobre una tasa de crecimiento económico sostenible suscita profundas preguntas sobre el futuro de Estados Unidos. ¿Ingresamos en un período prolongado de crecimiento económico lento? Si es así, ¿cómo altera eso la sociedad y la política? ¿O acaso las medidas “correctas” elevarán el crecimiento económico a niveles del pasado?

[OP-ED]: Trump’s great growth debate

 08/09/2017 - 08:58
There isn’t enough money to satisfy all our demands, even at higher rates of economic growth. There will be conflicts between private and governmental spending; between national and local spending; between health spending and non-health spending; and between spending on the old versus the young. The present is contentious; the future may be worse.

The argument between the Trump administration and its critics over a sustainable rate of economic growth raises profound questions about America’s future. Have we entered a prolonged period of slow growth? If so, how does that alter society and politics? Or will the “right” policies raise growth to past levels? 

If you haven’t paid attention, here’s a brief overview of the debate.

[OP-ED]: Deficits forever?

 07/20/2017 - 12:15
The federal budget remains badly out of whack, even though we are near or at “full employment” (June unemployment rate: 4.4 percent). We cannot afford tax cuts; we need tax increases.

House Republicans, who are now deliberating the government’s 2018 budget, pledge to eliminate deficits within a decade. Well, good luck with that. It must be obvious that chronic deficits reflect a basic political impasse that can be broken only if majorities in Congress do things they’ve refused to do: trim Social Security benefits; raise taxes significantly; control health spending. There is a giant mismatch between what Americans want from government and what they’ll pay for with taxes.

Republican health plan is a death sentence for US Latinos, Democrats say.

 06/29/2017 - 03:51
Spectators listen as US Democratic Senator from New Jersey Bob Menendez delivers remarks at a press conference in opposition to the Senate Republican health care bill on the US Capitol grounds in Washington, DC, USA, 28 June 2017. EPA/SHAWN THEW

The independent Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that under the bill drafted by Republican senators, roughly 22 million Americans would lose their health insurance by 2026.  That number includes some 6 million Latinos, 1 million of them children, according to La Raza.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

Republican divisions force postponement of healthcare bill vote

 06/28/2017 - 05:27
Senate Majority Leader Republican Mitch McConnell (R) turns away from the microphones beside Republican Senator from Texas John Cornyn (L) after speaking to members of the news media outside the West Wing of the White House following a meeting to discuss healthcare legislation with Senate Republicans and US President Donald J. Trump, in Washington, DC, USA, 27 June 2017. EPA/MICHAEL REYNOLDS

 US Senate Republicans on Tuesday found themselves forced - due to internal divisions - to postpone a vote on the controversial bill designed to replace former President Barack Obama"s healthcare reform, a bill that could leave more than 20 million Americans without medical coverage.

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EFE