LIVE STREAMING
Secretary Cardona listened and emphasized the importance of continuing to share these stories and assured to be inspired by them.
Secretary Cardona listened and emphasized the importance of continuing to share these stories and assured to be inspired by them.

10th anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program and Immigrant Heritage Month

MÁS EN ESTA SECCIÓN

Comida boricua en la PSU

Diciembre 01, 2022

Estudiantes atletas latinos

Noviembre 30, 2022

Segregación escolar latina

Noviembre 29, 2022

Diversidad en Temple

Noviembre 21, 2022

Una latina en Apple

Noviembre 16, 2022

Acción afirmativa

Noviembre 16, 2022

Huelga histórica en la UC

Noviembre 15, 2022

Bloqueado... ¡de nuevo!

Noviembre 15, 2022

COMPARTA ESTE CONTENIDO:

U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona participated this week in a virtual discussion with six DACAmented students, educators, school counselors, and policy leaders in honor of  Immigrant Heritage Month and the 10th anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA), a program which provides temporary status to undocumented students and professionals.

“My experience as an undocumented educator has brought me a sense of understanding. My students might not know that they’re undocumented, but I work with a lot of parents, especially in special education. We are a team and they are a very important part of that team. And when they find out that I’m undocumented, that I’m on the same boat as them, it really does open the doors and really facilitates the relationships that are needed to ensure the success of their children,” said Karen Reyes a special education teacher in Austin.

There are an estimated 200,000 DACA educators in schools and classrooms who are a lifeline for students. Since the implementation of the program, over 830,000 people have been able to live, study, and work without fear of deportation and continue to contribute billions in taxes each year.  

“I’ve been able to use my own personal story and vulnerability to work with DACAmented students via one-on-one sessions to help them adapt their own narrative and confidence in sharing their unique personal experiences. Supporting students right from the beginning in developing, choosing, and exploring careers is critical to their success,”  highlighted Maria Almendra Rodriguez a school counselor and Professor at Mt. San Antonio College in Southern California.

Secretary Cardona listened and emphasized the importance of continuing to share these stories and assured to be inspired by them.

“We need to hear your stories, your lived experiences. You’ve taken the challenges and you’ve turned them into helping others and I’m just so inspired by that. You’re making such a difference in the lives of the people you touch. Continue doing what you’re doing y les prometo que le vamos a echar ganas aquí también. We’re committed at the Department not only to listening but to acting with what we’ve heard.”

Alondra Garcia a bilingual educator in Milwaukee also shared her story and ensured the importance of letting younger students know how undocumented individuals contribute significantly to the community.

“I’ve been educating my young students who are seven-eight years old about what undocumented and DACA mean to ensure they’re aware of how undocumented people contribute to our communities. I think it’s so important to educate our communities and staff about what DACA is because so many people are not familiar with the program, given that it does not directly affect them.”  

00:00 / 00:00
Ads destiny link