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In 2030, Hispanic students will be followed by Blacks, who will represent about 14% of public schools population. Photo credit: GettyImages.

What will happen to Latinos in the education system by 2030?

Predictions say almost 30% of students in public schools will be Hispanic by the end of the decade, but changes need to happen to help them succeed.

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Many would think that the cause for the increase of Latinos in the United States would be immigration. However, that’s not the case. 

According to Pew Research Center (PRC), an average of one million Latino babies were born each year during the 2010s — a little bit more than the previous decade. At the same time, there was a decrease in the number of immigrants arriving — around 350,000 Latinos came annually.  

In 2000, Hispanic students represented about 16% of the public schools population — less than eight million students. Considering the increase of this population, predictions say this trend will soon be noticeable in public schools all around the country. 

According to the National Center of Education Statistics (NCES),  Latino students will represent nearly 30% of the school population by 2030 — an estimate of 14 million students. They will be the second-largest group in the education system, only falling behind white students, 43%. However, schools need to start making changes to make sure this population succeeds.    

Considering that Latinos had the greater decline when compared to other racial and ethnic groups on recent standardized tests, it is clear that something needs to be done in order to address the education and representation needs of this growing population. USA Today News made an analysis on the accommodations that Latino students, and their families, already need to prepare for the upcoming future. 

Taking into consideration the diverse ethnic background that Latinos come from, there should be, for example, more materials in Spanish — not only for students, but also for the families to be able to engage in their children’s education. According to NCES data, in 2019, more than 75% of English-language learners (students learning English as a second language) had Spanish as their home language, as well as 7.9% of all students in public schools. 

As studies show that Latino parents have become more interested in the school system since the pandemic, it is important to make sure that this community is included in the discussions. 

As for Latinos in higher education, they seem to be eager for more representation in professors and for programs that focus on Laitno-inclusivity — key components to guarantee student retention in schools. Colleges and universities are aiming to attract more Latinos as this group enrollment keeps increasing, while overall enrollment decreases. 

According to PRC, Latino enrollment in colleges across the country increased from 2.9 million to 4.1 million from 2010 to 2021 — and 19% of all college students were Latino in 2021.

Despite the increase, the price of college is still a major challenge for many Latino families. Most students depend on scholarships to be able to pursue their education, and a recent PRC report says Hispanic students are less likely to graduate. 

USA Today News points out how important it is for K-12 schools to help the increasing Latino student population understand their possibilities to afford college. Colleges and universities must also make an effort to embrace and celebrate the culture of the new Latinos that are getting into higher education. 

If you want to read more insights about the analysis, click here

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