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From Rio de Janeiro to Franky Bradley’s: Maga Bo in Philly

From Rio de Janeiro to Franky Bradley’s: Maga Bo in Philly

On Saturday May 2, Maga Bo will lead “a night dedicated to both old-school rhythms and nu-skool riddims from Latin America, Africa, and the Caribbean hosted by…

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Philly’s cultural platform TROPICALISMO is bringing the explosive tropical bass and Afro-Brazilian percussion of Brazil-based DJ Maga Bo to the newly opened Frankie Bradley’s.

On Saturday May 2, Maga Bo will lead “a night dedicated to both old-school rhythms and nu-skool riddims from Latin America, Africa, and the Caribbean,”  announced the organizers.

Spanning the breadth of international urban bass music, Maga Bo's work makes connections between the organic and the electronic, the traditional and the avant-garde and the local with the global.

His current work is decidedly Afro-Brazilian oriented and includes collaborations with some of Brazil’s brightest talents — from BNegão and Marcelo Yuka to Grupo Bongar and Samba de Coco Raízes de Arcoverde.

The U.S.-born DJ has performed from India to Ethiopia to Brazil to major summer festivals across Europe, North America and Australia. He is returning to Philly for the second time since 2010 hosted by TROPICALISMO, a cultural platform co-founded by Greg Scruggs (Gregzinho) and Juan Bustamante (Juanderful).

“We started TROPICALISMO almost five years ago to promote music that we never heard in Philly. Known as Tropical Bass or Global Bass, it includes traditional rhythms from Latin America, the Caribbean and Africa mixed with electronic music,” Bustamante said. “We were also inspired by tropical dance parties in other cities like ‘Que Bajo’ in New York, ‘Peligrosa’ in Austin and ‘Tormenta Tropical’ in San Francisco. Philly didn’t have anything like it.”

Both co-curators aim to provide a multisensory experience.

“Guests get down to the sounds that bump out of makeshift buses and Carnival sound systems alike all across the Americas. They taste local food that fuels late nights on the dance floor,” explains their mission statement. “Usually from small businesses in Philly's growing immigrant hubs, and experience the cultural events and holidays that mark the year for different communities, from Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) to Carnival.”

 

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