wearing

In Search of the Maya World: From Central America to Philadelphia

 06/27/2017 - 14:26
Gallery of archaeological pieces of Mayan culture exhibited at the Museum of Archeology and Anthropology of the University of Pennsylvania. Photo: Supplied UPEnn

One of the most intriguing mysteries of Latin American culture is what happened to the Maya civilization. How come after over 3,000 years of history, from about 2, 500 BC to 950 AD, most of the glorious Maya centers in Mesoamerica were abandoned? Before the arrival of the Europeans in the 1500’s magnificent cities like Tikal in Guatemala and Copán in Honduras had all but disappeared; left uninhabited, they were covered by thick jungle growth, hidden throughout the mountains and the lowlands. 

Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 1:15pm
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[OP-ED]: It’s getting harder to tell the journalists from the performers

 06/26/2017 - 08:29
En abril de 2015, mientras trabajaba como corresponsal político en jefe para Politico, Thrush envió una serie inapropiada de emails al presidente de la campaña de Hillary Clinton, John Poodesta. En uno de ellos, Thrush dijo a Podesta que estaba trabajando en una historia de recaudación de fondos y preguntó:”¿Puedo mandarte un par de párrafos, extraoficialmente, para asegurarme de que no meto la pata en nada?”. nytimes.com

Americans sense that Big Media is a big mess, but they can’t put their finger on why that is. 

Memory takes me back to August 1997, when I arrived in Phoenix to start my first full-time newspaper job as a general assignment reporter. I was greeted by the managing editor, an old-school journalist who spelled out the rules of the profession and made clear what he expected from me.

Monday, June 26, 2017 - 8:00am

[OP-ED]: Rather than heading to the silver screen, take a moment this summer to look inward

 06/16/2017 - 12:30
Try Michael Sandel’s “Justice: What’s the Right Thing To Do?,” which covers a wide range of thought provoking questions about civic life and describes the philosophical foundations for competing impulses. (The wonderful 12-hour Harvard lecture series is available to view on YouTube, as well.)

 Last week, I packed my husband and two sons off to enjoy their much-anticipated viewing of the new superhero movie “Wonder Woman.”

I used to partake in such outings to the summer action blockbuster, but by the time “Wonder Woman” came out, I was already sick and tired of being browbeaten by countless feminine-power “hot takes” and “think pieces,” plus the inevitable reports of outrage.

Friday, June 16, 2017 - 12:15pm

[OP-ED]: Documentary ‘Elián’ Brings Back Painful Memories for Cubans

 06/06/2017 - 16:28
Elián nació en Cárdenas, una tranquila ciudad costera tres horas al este de La Habana. Y yo también. Solo para sumar otro elemento de coincidencia, mi hermano menor, que vive en Miami y es médico, también se llama Elián. Foto: Cibercuba

“Elián,” a recently released documentary about the saga of Elián González, the little Cuban castaway that became a worldwide cause célèbre 17 years ago, is bringing back painful memories of the Cold War-induced bitter political battle between South Florida Cuban-Americans and Cubans on the island. At a time when President Trump seems poised to reverse Barack Obama’s measures and go back to a Cuba policy of hostility and irrationality, the film becomes even more distressing.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 4:15pm
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Flying Brooms: Economic crisis, infidelity keep Mexican witchcraft alive

 05/09/2017 - 02:29
Esoteric items at the market of Sonora in Mexico City, Mexico on Apr. 28, 2017. EFE/Alex Cruz

The economic crisis and marital infidelity are keeping such witchcraft practices as Santeria, shamanism and spiritualism alive in Mexico, as shown by the sale of articles said to possess the power to drive away poverty and keep a lover from wandering.

Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 2:15am
Plain Text Author: 
EFE

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