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View of the damages caused after the passage of Hurricane Maria on Friday, September 22, 2017, in San Juan (Puerto Rico). Although it is already far from Puerto Rico, which devastated with floods and massive power outages on Tuesday, Maria could leave the island up to an additional 6 inches (152 millimeters) of water, with isolated storms that would leave a total accumulation of 40 inches (1016 millimeters) . EFE / Thais Llorca

After hours isolated and without electricity throughout the island, the rescue groups try to evaluate the outcome of Hurricane Maria, and the images are devastating.

[OP-ED]: The curse of middle-aged capitalism -- for Trump and all of us

 08/21/2017 - 13:57
In 1995, the largest five firms by market “capitalization” (the value of a company’s shares) were old-line businesses: Exxon, AT&T, Coca Cola, General Electric and Merck. By 2015, only Exxon (now Exxon Mobil) remained.

 A persisting puzzle about the U.S. economy is how it can seem both strong and weak. On the one hand, it remains a citadel of innovation, producing new companies like Uber. On the other, the economy is expanding at a snail’s pace of 2 percent annually since 2010. How could both be true? Why isn’t innovation translating into faster growth? The answer -- or part of the answer -- is that American businesses are running on two separate tracks. Call them the “youthful” and “middle-aged” tracks.

Barcelona attack: Ripoll, the Pyrenees town that spawned a terrorist cell

 08/21/2017 - 08:07
Varias mujeres familiares de los jóvenes de Ripoll (Girona) presuntos autores de los atentados de Barcelona y Cambrils (Tarragona), durante la concentración que ha realizado la comunidad musulmana esta tarde en la plaza del Ayuntamiento para expresar, "rotos" de dolor, el rechazo a lo ocurrido y guardar un minuto de silencio por las víctimas. EFE/Robin Townsend

 The Spanish authorities said that the attacks that killed at least 14 people in Barcelona and Cambrils appeared to be part of a terrorist cell’s extensive plot led by the imam of a the small mountain town of Ripoll. He may have died a day before the attacks when explosives that the group was manufacturing accidentally detonated.

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"Era como volver a 1960", cuentan testigos de la marcha supremacista en EEUU

 08/14/2017 - 05:06
People place flowers at the corner of Fourth and East Water Street in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, 13 August 2017. A woman killed when a car slammed into counter-protesters at that intersection following the cancelation of a planned white supremacist march in that city was identified on 13 August 2017 by authorities as 32-year-old Heather Heyer. EPA/TASOS KATOPODIS

Una de las víctimas ha sido identificada como Heather Heyer, activista anti-racista,  de 32 años.  En un intento por frenar la lluvia de críticas contra Donald Trump por su ambigua respuesta al ataque sucedido en Charlottesville el pasado sábado, la Casa Blanca emitió un comunicado 36 horas después en el que condemnaba a los "supremacistas blancos" por incitar a la violencia. 

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EFE

Heather Heyer, Charlottesville Victim, Identified as Anti-Racism Demonstrator

 08/14/2017 - 04:50
People place flowers at the corner of Fourth and East Water Street in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, 13 August 2017. A woman killed when a car slammed into counter-protesters at that intersection following the cancelation of a planned white supremacist march in that city was identified on 13 August 2017 by authorities as 32-year-old Heather Heyer. EPA/TASOS KATOPODIS

Trying to stop the fallout over President Trump’s ambiguous response to this weekend's incident in Charlottesville, Va., the White House condemned “white supremacists” for inciting violence in a statement, issued 36 hours after the protests began.

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Andrea Rodés/ EFE

10th immigrant found in overheated tractor-trailer dies in Texas

 07/25/2017 - 05:37
Photo taken on July 23, 2017, of the tractor-trailer without air conditioning found in San Antonio, Texas, to contain 38 suspected undocumented immigrants, of whom the 10th died on Monday, July 24, in a San Antonio Hospital. EFE/Darren Abat

 Among the dead was a so-called Dreamer, a migrant brought to the United States as a young child. Another 30 undocumented immigrants packed in the trailer were still alive but gasping from the lack of oxygen and the sweltering heat. They were taken to nearby hospitals where 17 are in critical condition.

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With information from EFE
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[OP-ED]: In today’s immigration debate, even the truth is controversial

 06/29/2017 - 09:28
Acting Director of Immigration and Customs Thomas Homan talks about the immigration policies of the Trump administration during a press conference in the press room James Brady of the White House in Washington. EFE

How absurd has the immigration debate become? This absurd: It is now considered controversial when people simply tell the truth. 

As when the acting director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement explains the cold reality that anyone in the United States without the proper legal documents “should be concerned” about being apprehended and deported.

In Search of the Maya World: From Central America to Philadelphia

 06/27/2017 - 14:26
Gallery of archaeological pieces of Mayan culture exhibited at the Museum of Archeology and Anthropology of the University of Pennsylvania. Photo: Supplied UPEnn

One of the most intriguing mysteries of Latin American culture is what happened to the Maya civilization. How come after over 3,000 years of history, from about 2, 500 BC to 950 AD, most of the glorious Maya centers in Mesoamerica were abandoned? Before the arrival of the Europeans in the 1500’s magnificent cities like Tikal in Guatemala and Copán in Honduras had all but disappeared; left uninhabited, they were covered by thick jungle growth, hidden throughout the mountains and the lowlands. 

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[OP-ED]: What really happened to coal?

 06/12/2017 - 08:58
Even if environmental regulation and climate change didn’t exist, the coal industry would have faced intense pressures to change and adapt. Government isn’t killing the coal industry. “Progress is the culprit,” concludes Kolstad’s study.

 The coal-mining jobs that President Trump thinks were destroyed by government regulation -- adopted to combat air pollution and global warming -- were actually lost to old-fashioned competition from other American firms and workers. Eastern coal mines lost market share to Western coal, which was cheaper. And natural gas grew at coal’s expense because it had low costs and lower greenhouse gas emissions.

[OP-ED]: The perils of assuming anything about the Latino vote

 05/18/2017 - 08:20
You don’t need to be a political scientist to figure out a few simple truths: In raw numbers, more and more Hispanics will cast ballots in upcoming elections -- as has been the case for the past 36 years.

At the outset of their new book, “Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign,” Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes note that adviser David Plouffe prioritized three goals for Clinton to win: “It was important to have the right culture and mission, to manage Bill Clinton, and to effectively target Latino voters.”

We know how well that turned out.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda