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[OP-ED]: El gran debate de Trump sobre el crecimiento económico

 08/15/2017 - 10:01
No hay suficiente dinero para satisfacer todas nuestras demandas, incluso a tasas más altas de crecimiento económico. Habrá conflictos entre gastos privados y gubernamentales; entre gastos nacionales y locales; entre gastos de salud y gastos de no-salud; y entre gastos dedicados a los ancianos versus los jóvenes. El presente es polémico; el futuro quizás sea peor.

La discusión entre el gobierno de Trump y sus críticos sobre una tasa de crecimiento económico sostenible suscita profundas preguntas sobre el futuro de Estados Unidos. ¿Ingresamos en un período prolongado de crecimiento económico lento? Si es así, ¿cómo altera eso la sociedad y la política? ¿O acaso las medidas “correctas” elevarán el crecimiento económico a niveles del pasado?

[OP-ED]: Trump’s great growth debate

 08/09/2017 - 08:58
There isn’t enough money to satisfy all our demands, even at higher rates of economic growth. There will be conflicts between private and governmental spending; between national and local spending; between health spending and non-health spending; and between spending on the old versus the young. The present is contentious; the future may be worse.

The argument between the Trump administration and its critics over a sustainable rate of economic growth raises profound questions about America’s future. Have we entered a prolonged period of slow growth? If so, how does that alter society and politics? Or will the “right” policies raise growth to past levels? 

If you haven’t paid attention, here’s a brief overview of the debate.

[OP-ED]: Deficits forever?

 07/20/2017 - 12:15
The federal budget remains badly out of whack, even though we are near or at “full employment” (June unemployment rate: 4.4 percent). We cannot afford tax cuts; we need tax increases.

House Republicans, who are now deliberating the government’s 2018 budget, pledge to eliminate deficits within a decade. Well, good luck with that. It must be obvious that chronic deficits reflect a basic political impasse that can be broken only if majorities in Congress do things they’ve refused to do: trim Social Security benefits; raise taxes significantly; control health spending. There is a giant mismatch between what Americans want from government and what they’ll pay for with taxes.

[OP-ED]: Heroin Corridor Cleanup – Is City Hall Addicted to Exclusion?

 07/19/2017 - 10:54
The train-tracks in  the area between Kensington Av. and Fairhill is known as “El Campamento”. The City of Philadelphia and Conrail signed an agreement in June to clean and seal this place. The company’s deadline is schedule on to July 31st. File AL DÍA News

Disappointment is how Louis Cruz described his reaction to the closed door he encountered when he sought work for his company on the project City Hall and Conrail proudly announced recently to cleanup a section of railroad tracks in West Kensington where a filthy heroin abuse corridor has festered for nearly twenty years.

[OP-ED]: Why robots won’t steal all our jobs

 07/14/2017 - 08:43
En un mundo ideal, los robots realizarían la mayoría de los trabajos repetitivos y monótonos, mientras que la fuerza de trabajo mejor educada y mejor paga se concentraría en trabajos que no pueden ser realizados por máquinas. Archivo

Don’t worry, the robots won’t destroy all our jobs. History suggests just the opposite -- that new technologies inspire new jobs. So concludes a study from leading labor economists. It’s a useful antidote to widespread fears that robots and “artificial intelligence” will displace millions of workers and lead to permanently high joblessness.

[OP-ED]: Postponing the next recession?

 06/30/2017 - 08:37
Economists from the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) in Basel, Switzerland -- a bank for government central banks -- find that the pass-through from wage increases to price increases has weakened. If this is confirmed and continues, it implies that inflation will remain tame for some time even if the economy continues to grow. EFE

This is not your father’s inflation -- and that’s good news. Business cycles often end when higher inflation causes a country’s central bank (the Federal Reserve in the United States) to raise interest rates, slowing the economy and, perhaps, triggering a recession. The good news: The next recession may be delayed, because the Phillips Curve has shifted.

[OP-ED]: Cleaning The ‘Heroin Hell’ Will Not Create Heaven In Surrounding Communities

 06/26/2017 - 10:41
'Bedroom' for a man in Philadelphia's West Kensington community where festering structural impoverishment sparks social ills like rampant drug sales. LBW Photo

The recent announcement that City Hall and Conrail cut a deal to cleanup the notorious heroin corridor along a section of railroad track running through Philadelphia’s Fairhill and West Kensington communities is welcomed removal of a dangerous blight that’s festered for nearly two decades.

[OP-ED]: Pensar en el bien común, la razón fundamental para ayudar a los niños a que crezcan y den lo mejor de sí mismos

 06/19/2017 - 11:10
Alumnos de una escuela gestionada por la mezquita de Blikkiesdorp, un barrio de la periferia de Ciudad del Cabo, Sudáfrica. Linn Washington

El pasado 16 de junio, Día de la Juventud, diversas protestas estallaron en varias ciudades de Sudáfrica. Dichas protestas sirvieron para recordar  los orígenes de esta importante celebración anual para el país.

[OP-ED]: Globalization’s false sins

 05/17/2017 - 08:26
Las importaciones a menudo son más baratas que los productos norteamericanos, ayudan especialmente a las familias de bajos ingresos, cuyos presupuestos constan de más productos manufacturados, donde el descenso de los precios fue agudo.

Globalization has gotten a bad rap. The Trump White House associates it with all manner of economic evil, especially job loss. The administration has made undoing the damage a central part of its economic strategy. This will almost certainly fail and disappoint, because globalization’s ill-effects have been wildly exaggerated.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: Will robots dis-employ us all?

 05/11/2017 - 10:11
The robots won’t steal all our jobs, because their efficiencies will create more purchasing power for other spending or new products that require human involvement and oversight. For proof, consider smartphones. In 2012, they had created nearly 500,000 jobs for “mobile apps,” up from zero in 2007.

 We have yet another study that debunks the widespread notion that robots -- and other forms of automation, including “artificial intelligence” -- will destroy our jobs and lead to a future of permanently high unemployment. According to the study, that would completely rewrite history, which has shown job creation to be an enduring strength of the U.S. economy.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: Puerto Rico no aguanta más

 05/04/2017 - 12:18
Un manifestante ondea una bandera quemada ,en San Juan, Puerto Rico, durante el paro general contra los recortes, que coincide con el Primero de Mayo, Día Internacional del Trabajador. EFE

Mensaje a todos esos que en Puerto Rico se rasgaron las vestiduras escandalizados, según ellos, por las piedras lanzadas --sabrá Dios por quién—durante la marcha del 1ro. de mayo en San Juan, y que son los mismos que trataron de restar importancia a las 200,000 personas que protestaron pacíficamente las extremas medidas de austeridad y la junta imperial de control fiscal que decide su futuro: ustedes, o vergonzosamente desconocen la realidad de su nación o han sido cómplices en su creación.

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[OP-ED]: Puerto Ricans Are Not Taking It Any More

 05/03/2017 - 10:11
A protester flies a flag burned May 1, 2017, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, during the general strike against the cuts, which coincides with May Day, International Labor Day. EFE

Message to all those self-righteous individuals in Puerto Rico who made a show of being scandalized by the stones thrown –God knows by whom—during the May 1st march in San Juan, while minimizing the 200,000 people who peacefully protested the extreme austerity measures and the imperial federal control board deciding their future: You must either ignore your nation’s reality or be complicit in its creation. In either case, shame on you.

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