Advertisement

uber

[OP-ED]: Why robots won’t steal all our jobs

 07/14/2017 - 08:43
En un mundo ideal, los robots realizarían la mayoría de los trabajos repetitivos y monótonos, mientras que la fuerza de trabajo mejor educada y mejor paga se concentraría en trabajos que no pueden ser realizados por máquinas. Archivo

Don’t worry, the robots won’t destroy all our jobs. History suggests just the opposite -- that new technologies inspire new jobs. So concludes a study from leading labor economists. It’s a useful antidote to widespread fears that robots and “artificial intelligence” will displace millions of workers and lead to permanently high joblessness.

[OP-ED]: Por qué los robots no se van a robar nuestros trabajos

 07/14/2017 - 08:41
En un mundo ideal, los robots realizarían la mayoría de los trabajos repetitivos y monótonos, mientras que la fuerza de trabajo mejor educada y mejor paga se concentraría en trabajos que no pueden ser realizados por máquinas. Archivo

No se preocupen, los robots no van a destruir nuestros trabajos. La historia sugiere lo contrario: que las nuevas tecnologías traen nuevos trabajos. Es un antídoto útil ante el miedo generalizado de que los robots y “la inteligencia artificial” desplazarán a millones de trabajadores y llevarán a un desempleo alto y permanente.

[OP-ED]: What happens when you pay entrepreneurial teenagers $100,000 to not go to college?

 03/02/2017 - 15:06
Wall Street Journal reporter Alexandra Wolfe tells us how it all panned out for the first class of “Thiel Fellows” in her deliciously detailed book “Valley of the Gods: A Silicon Valley Story.”

In 2011, billionaire Peter Thiel made headlines when he announced that he would pay 20 teenagers $100,000 each to drop out or delay college and start businesses in biotechnology, finance, energy and education.

Thiel, the co-founder of PayPal, a venture capitalist and early investor in Facebook, wanted to underscore his belief that college costs too much, isn’t as intellectually rigorous as it once was, and leaves recent grads burdened with student loans that keep them from taking the entrepreneurial risks needed to spur the economy.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda