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[OP-ED]: The curse of middle-aged capitalism -- for Trump and all of us

 08/21/2017 - 13:57
In 1995, the largest five firms by market “capitalization” (the value of a company’s shares) were old-line businesses: Exxon, AT&T, Coca Cola, General Electric and Merck. By 2015, only Exxon (now Exxon Mobil) remained.

 A persisting puzzle about the U.S. economy is how it can seem both strong and weak. On the one hand, it remains a citadel of innovation, producing new companies like Uber. On the other, the economy is expanding at a snail’s pace of 2 percent annually since 2010. How could both be true? Why isn’t innovation translating into faster growth? The answer -- or part of the answer -- is that American businesses are running on two separate tracks. Call them the “youthful” and “middle-aged” tracks.

[OP-ED]: The Art of the Bluff

 08/15/2017 - 15:13
Trump has made clear that the United States would respond to North Korean nuclear threats with a massive military strike, possibly involving nuclear weapons. EFE

How did we get here? Why does it appear that we’re on the brink of a war in Asia, one that could involve nuclear weapons? North Korea has had nuclear-weapons capacity for at least 10 years now. Have its recent advances been so dramatic and significant to force the United States to wage a preventive war? No. The crisis we now find ourselves in has been exaggerated and mishandled by the Trump administration to a degree that is deeply worrying and dangerous.

[OP-ED]: Growing disgust with the ethos of college campuses does not mean a rejection of higher education

 07/18/2017 - 15:00
According to the National Student Clearinghouse, which tracks college enrollments, the number of students in colleges and universities has now dropped for five straight years, and this year 81,000 fewer high school graduates nationwide are heading to higher-education institutions. 

A recent survey on the public’s view of national institutions elicited headlines that suggested a tale of backwardness and ignorance. One example: “Majority of Republicans Think Higher Education is Bad for America.” 

The reality is more complex.

Global Cyberattack: What We Need to Worry About?

 06/28/2017 - 06:00
An engineer checks live cyber threat maps and statistics at his office in Istanbul, Turkey, 27 June 2017. EPA/ERDEM SAHIN

Most damaging acts of cyber aggression have not been 'acts of war' according to the rigid standards of international law. Thus governments and international organisations struggle to prescribe an effective response to cyber actions -- even as they continue to cause grave economic, social, and political harm, Oxford expert says.  

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