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City Controller Alan Butkovitz recent audit says Philadelphia Schools are at risk of losing vital funding. Photo courtesy: Wikimedia.

17 schools in Philadelphia at risk for losing state grant according to City Controller.

[OP-ED]: The importance of minority teachers in our schools

 04/27/2017 - 14:30
According to a new statistical analysis by the U.S. Department of Education, even though minority teachers remain underrepresented, both the number and proportion of minority teachers in elementary and high schools grew by 104 percent between 1987-88 and 2011-12, compared with 38 percent growth in the number of white teachers.

Black teachers make a difference.

I know because I attended a prestigious college-preparatory public high school in the heart of Chicago where approximately half of the teachers were black. They included my AP Biology teacher and AP English teacher, several of my art teachers, one of my history teachers, a chemistry teacher -- and probably many more I’m forgetting in the haze of the past quarter-century.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

Who wants to study Spanish in Philadelphia?

 03/28/2017 - 16:30
María Paredes Fernández, profesora de español en Penn University, fue nominada el año pasado como “mejor profesora de español de EEUU”, por la Asociación Americana de Profesores de Español y Portugués (AATSP). Foto: Peter Fitzpatrick

The Hispanic immigrant community has played a fundamental role in the growth of the city in the last decade. In the streets it is more and more common to hear conversations held in Spanish. However, it seems that this important trend is not reflected in universities. Why? A general crisis in the study of the humanities would be the answer. AL DÍA News spoke with professors from three of the most prominent universities in the city.

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[OP-ED]: Is your phone eavesdropping on your conversation about cannibalism? Mine may have.

 03/08/2017 - 18:41

Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

If you were to read biology professor Bill Schutt’s new book “Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,” you’d have lots to talk about at the dinner table.

There are, for instance, sections on how cannibalism is portrayed in popular culture, news stories and historical texts. Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: Who’s hoarding the American Dream?

 07/18/2017 - 15:54
“Upper-middle-class parents have the means to spend two to three times more time with their preschool children than less affluent parents,” he wrote. He also excoriated “the structural ways the well-educated rig the system” -- mainly restrictive zoning and easier college admissions, including legacy preferences. impakter.com

To hear Richard Reeves tell it, the upper middle class is fast becoming the bane of American society. Its members have entrenched themselves just below the top 1 percent and protect their privileged position through public policy and private behavior. Americans cherish the belief that they live in a mobile society, where hard work and imagination are rewarded. The upper middle class is destroying this faith, because it’s impeding poorer Americans from getting ahead.

Economic tier scheme for CPS selective enrollment schools: go back to the drawing board

 11/16/2009 - 11:53
Economic tier scheme for CPS selective enrollment schools: go back to the drawing board

Looking back on it, I just don’t know how I made it in.

Growing up at Addison and Lincoln there was no question where I wanted to go to high school: the gorgeous, ivy-covered walls of Albert G. Lane Technical High School up the street at Addison and Western.

The place where, every time I mentioned it, older folks would say "that place, yeah, my brother went there…before they let girls in."

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda