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View of several copies of the full budget proposal for 2018 at the Capitol in Washington DC today, May 23, 2017. EFE / Shawn Thew

According to financial analysts, President Trump's budget for 2018 clearly indicates a cut in the benefits of the poor and an increase in the cash flow for wealthy taxpayers.

[OP-ED]: The curse of middle-aged capitalism -- for Trump and all of us

 08/21/2017 - 13:57
In 1995, the largest five firms by market “capitalization” (the value of a company’s shares) were old-line businesses: Exxon, AT&T, Coca Cola, General Electric and Merck. By 2015, only Exxon (now Exxon Mobil) remained.

 A persisting puzzle about the U.S. economy is how it can seem both strong and weak. On the one hand, it remains a citadel of innovation, producing new companies like Uber. On the other, the economy is expanding at a snail’s pace of 2 percent annually since 2010. How could both be true? Why isn’t innovation translating into faster growth? The answer -- or part of the answer -- is that American businesses are running on two separate tracks. Call them the “youthful” and “middle-aged” tracks.

[OP-ED]: Donald Trump’s lost opportunity

 07/26/2017 - 09:12
Donald Trump could have quickly begun reshaping American politics. He heard voices that others didn’t, understood what those people wanted to hear and articulated much of it. But when it came time to deliver, it turned out that he had no serious ideas, policies, nor even the desire to search for them. EFE

There are many ways to evaluate the Trump presidency at the six-month mark. What I am struck by is the path not taken, the lost opportunity. Donald Trump had many flaws, but during the campaign, he tapped into a real set of problems facing America and a deep frustration with the existing political system. Additionally, he embraced and expressed -- somewhat inconsistently -- a populism that went beyond the traditional left-right divide. What would things look like at this point if President Trump had governed in the manner of a pragmatic, jobs-oriented reformer who was relentlessly focused on the “forgotten” Americans of whom he often speaks?

[OP-ED]: Deficits forever?

 07/20/2017 - 12:15
The federal budget remains badly out of whack, even though we are near or at “full employment” (June unemployment rate: 4.4 percent). We cannot afford tax cuts; we need tax increases.

House Republicans, who are now deliberating the government’s 2018 budget, pledge to eliminate deficits within a decade. Well, good luck with that. It must be obvious that chronic deficits reflect a basic political impasse that can be broken only if majorities in Congress do things they’ve refused to do: trim Social Security benefits; raise taxes significantly; control health spending. There is a giant mismatch between what Americans want from government and what they’ll pay for with taxes.

Republican health plan is a death sentence for US Latinos, Democrats say.

 06/29/2017 - 03:51
Spectators listen as US Democratic Senator from New Jersey Bob Menendez delivers remarks at a press conference in opposition to the Senate Republican health care bill on the US Capitol grounds in Washington, DC, USA, 28 June 2017. EPA/SHAWN THEW

The independent Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that under the bill drafted by Republican senators, roughly 22 million Americans would lose their health insurance by 2026.  That number includes some 6 million Latinos, 1 million of them children, according to La Raza.

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EFE

Trump administration announced a tax reform that means: "cut taxes for the rich"

 04/27/2017 - 03:35
US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (R) and National Economic Director Gary Cohn (L) participate in a news conference to discuss the tax reform plan of US President Donald J. Trump, in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House in Washington, DC, USA, 26 April 2017. EPA/MICHAEL REYNOLDS

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Wednesday outlined President Donald Trump"s tax overhaul plan, which calls for slashing the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 15 percent. Critics immediately called it “basically a huge tax cut for the rich”.

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[OP-ED]: La madre de todos los ‘blufs’

 04/19/2017 - 08:02
Afortunadamente, no es solo el pánico lo que se expande, también lo hace la resistencia, que cada día crece y se fortalece. Y eso es muy bueno.

Sí, eso es lo que retórica recalentada de Washington sobre Corea del Norte –a la que el país asiático responde en tonos igualmente belicosos – es en realidad: una sucia guerra de palabras. Pero puede estar seguro de que no están a punto de intercambiarse balas, cohetes, la madre de todas las bombas y mucho menos armas atómicas. Lo cual, por supuesto, es muy bueno.

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[OP-ED]: The Mother of All Bluffs

 04/18/2017 - 18:22
Not only panic is spreading, resistance is also growing by leaps and bounds.EFE

Yes, that’s what the heated rhetoric coming from Washington about North Korea –and being responded to in no less bellicose tones by the Asian country – is: a nasty war of words. Rest assured that no bullets, no rockets, no mother of all bombs, not to mention atomic weapons are about to be fired, dropped or exchanged. Which, of course, is great.

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More Transparency Please

 04/17/2017 - 02:08
Trump attends Easter service at Palm Beach episcopal church. EPA/MICHAEL REYNOLDS

New calls for President Trump to release his tax returns came amid furor over the White House’s decision to no longer share visitor logs. That bars the public from knowing who has access to officials, even as Mr. Trump fills top jobs with former consultants and lobbysts.

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EFE