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[OP-ED]: The curse of middle-aged capitalism -- for Trump and all of us

 08/21/2017 - 13:57
In 1995, the largest five firms by market “capitalization” (the value of a company’s shares) were old-line businesses: Exxon, AT&T, Coca Cola, General Electric and Merck. By 2015, only Exxon (now Exxon Mobil) remained.

 A persisting puzzle about the U.S. economy is how it can seem both strong and weak. On the one hand, it remains a citadel of innovation, producing new companies like Uber. On the other, the economy is expanding at a snail’s pace of 2 percent annually since 2010. How could both be true? Why isn’t innovation translating into faster growth? The answer -- or part of the answer -- is that American businesses are running on two separate tracks. Call them the “youthful” and “middle-aged” tracks.

[OP-ED]: Hunger on campus is a real problem with real solutions

 08/08/2017 - 14:45
When students are hungry, they miss class -- sometimes to pick up an extra shift at work, sometimes because they get sick because their immune systems are weak from malnutrition. 

When people my age look back on their college days, they often recall being “starving” students. But, back in a time when it was possible to complete a university education with some scholarships, a modest student loan and a part-time job, few of my peers were ever truly hungry.

[OP-ED]: El hambre en el campus es un problema real con soluciones reales

 08/08/2017 - 14:40
Cuando los estudiantes tienen hambre, pierden clases—a veces para trabajar otro turno, a veces porque se enferman debido a la debilidad de sus sistemas inmunes causada por la desnutrición. 

Cuando la gente de mi edad recuerda la época universitaria, a menudo recuerda haber sido un estudiante “muerto de hambre”. Pero, en una época en que era posible completar una educación universitaria con algunas becas, un modesto préstamo estudiantil y un trabajo de tiempo parcial, pocos de mis pares pasaron hambre de verdad.

[OP-ED]: Can we die in peace?

 07/28/2017 - 08:38
Just whether the persistence of high-cost care reflects good medicine, a deep human craving to cling to life, or both is unclear. But the rhetoric about “end-of-life” care has changed more than the reality. To the question -- Can we die in peace and with dignity? -- the answer is “not yet.”

For those of us who had hoped that American attitudes toward death were shifting in ways that would promote a wider reconstruction of the health care system, there’s discouraging news from Health Affairs, the pre-eminent journal of health policy. It devotes its latest issue to “end-of-life” care and finds that -- at least so far -- the power to make health care more compassionate and cost-effective is limited.